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Article: Differential influences of affective factors and contextual factors on high-proficiency readers and low-proficiency readers: A multilevel analysis of PIRLS data from Hong Kong

TitleDifferential influences of affective factors and contextual factors on high-proficiency readers and low-proficiency readers: A multilevel analysis of PIRLS data from Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringerOpen. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.com/journal/volumesAndIssues/40536
Citation
Large-scale Assessments in Education, 2014, v. 2, article no. 6 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined the impact of the reading-related affective factors home environment and school environment on predicting the likelihood of students being either high-proficiency or low-proficiency readers. Data from 3,875 Hong Kong SAR Grade 4 students participating in an international comparative assessment were analyzed. Multilevel regression analysis was used to model the relationship between affective factors (i.e., reading attitude, reading motivation, and reading self-concept) peer bullying, family context (i.e., home socioeconomic status/SES), and school context (i.e., school SES, school bullying, and school safety and order). The likelihood of being a reader with high proficiency was found to be associated with reading attitude, reading motivation, reading self-concept, peer bullying, school bullying, and school SES, whereas the likelihood of being a reader with low proficiency was associated with reading self-concept and peer bullying only. These findings suggest that reading-related affective characteristics and school context may be more likely to promote rather than limit reading success.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199257

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, SKen_US
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Xen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:10:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:10:39Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationLarge-scale Assessments in Education, 2014, v. 2, article no. 6en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199257-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the impact of the reading-related affective factors home environment and school environment on predicting the likelihood of students being either high-proficiency or low-proficiency readers. Data from 3,875 Hong Kong SAR Grade 4 students participating in an international comparative assessment were analyzed. Multilevel regression analysis was used to model the relationship between affective factors (i.e., reading attitude, reading motivation, and reading self-concept) peer bullying, family context (i.e., home socioeconomic status/SES), and school context (i.e., school SES, school bullying, and school safety and order). The likelihood of being a reader with high proficiency was found to be associated with reading attitude, reading motivation, reading self-concept, peer bullying, school bullying, and school SES, whereas the likelihood of being a reader with low proficiency was associated with reading self-concept and peer bullying only. These findings suggest that reading-related affective characteristics and school context may be more likely to promote rather than limit reading success.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringerOpen. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.com/journal/volumesAndIssues/40536-
dc.relation.ispartofLarge-scale Assessments in Educationen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDifferential influences of affective factors and contextual factors on high-proficiency readers and low-proficiency readers: A multilevel analysis of PIRLS data from Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, SK: sktse@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailXiao, X: xyxiao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, SK=rp00964en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40536-014-0006-3-
dc.identifier.hkuros230171en_US

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