File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Acupuncture and moxibustion for lateral elbow pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

TitleAcupuncture and moxibustion for lateral elbow pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials
Authors
KeywordsPRISMA
Tennis elbow
STRICTA
Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs)
Epicondylitis
Cochrane risk of bias tool
Chinese literature
Issue Date2014
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmccomplementalternmed/
Citation
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2014, v. 14, article no. 136 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Acupuncture and moxibustion have widely been used to treat lateral elbow pain (LEP). A comprehensive systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including both English and Chinese databases was conducted to assess the efficacy of acupuncture and moxibustion in the treatment of LEP.Methods: Revised STRICTA (2010) criteria were used to appraise the acupuncture procedures, the Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. A total of 19 RCTs that compared acupuncture and/or moxibustion with sham acupuncture, another form of acupuncture, or conventional treatment were included.Results: All studies had at least one domain rated as high risk or uncertain risk of bias in the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results from three RCTs of moderate quality showed that acupuncture was more effective than sham acupuncture. Results from 10 RCTs of mostly low quality showed that acupuncture or moxibustion was superior or equal to conventional treatment, such as local anesthetic injection, local steroid injection, non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs, or ultrasound. There were six low quality RCTs that compared acupuncture and moxibustion combined with manual acupuncture alone, and all showed that acupuncture and moxibustion combined was superior to manual acupuncture alone.Conclusion: Moderate quality studies suggest that acupuncture is more effective than sham acupuncture. Interpretations of findings regarding acupuncture vs. conventional treatment, and acupuncture and moxibustion combined vs. manual acupuncture alone are limited by the methodological qualities of these studies. Future studies with improved methodological design are warranted to confirm the efficacy of acupuncture and moxibustion for LEP. © 2014 Gadau et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198780
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.987
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.783
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGadau, Marcus-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Wingfai-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Hua-
dc.contributor.authorZaslawski, Chris J.-
dc.contributor.authorTan, Yuansheng-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Fuchun-
dc.contributor.authorBangrazi, Sergio-
dc.contributor.authorChung, Kafai-
dc.contributor.authorBian, Zhaoxiang-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Shiping-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-09T03:42:14Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-09T03:42:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2014, v. 14, article no. 136-
dc.identifier.issn1472-6882-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198780-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Acupuncture and moxibustion have widely been used to treat lateral elbow pain (LEP). A comprehensive systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including both English and Chinese databases was conducted to assess the efficacy of acupuncture and moxibustion in the treatment of LEP.Methods: Revised STRICTA (2010) criteria were used to appraise the acupuncture procedures, the Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. A total of 19 RCTs that compared acupuncture and/or moxibustion with sham acupuncture, another form of acupuncture, or conventional treatment were included.Results: All studies had at least one domain rated as high risk or uncertain risk of bias in the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results from three RCTs of moderate quality showed that acupuncture was more effective than sham acupuncture. Results from 10 RCTs of mostly low quality showed that acupuncture or moxibustion was superior or equal to conventional treatment, such as local anesthetic injection, local steroid injection, non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs, or ultrasound. There were six low quality RCTs that compared acupuncture and moxibustion combined with manual acupuncture alone, and all showed that acupuncture and moxibustion combined was superior to manual acupuncture alone.Conclusion: Moderate quality studies suggest that acupuncture is more effective than sham acupuncture. Interpretations of findings regarding acupuncture vs. conventional treatment, and acupuncture and moxibustion combined vs. manual acupuncture alone are limited by the methodological qualities of these studies. Future studies with improved methodological design are warranted to confirm the efficacy of acupuncture and moxibustion for LEP. © 2014 Gadau et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmccomplementalternmed/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine-
dc.rightsBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPRISMA-
dc.subjectTennis elbow-
dc.subjectSTRICTA-
dc.subjectRandomized Controlled Trials (RCTs)-
dc.subjectEpicondylitis-
dc.subjectCochrane risk of bias tool-
dc.subjectChinese literature-
dc.titleAcupuncture and moxibustion for lateral elbow pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6882-14-136-
dc.identifier.pmid24726029-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4012509-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84899928722-
dc.identifier.hkuros229292-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6882-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000335593000001-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats