File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The thoracic shape of hominoids

TitleThe thoracic shape of hominoids
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ari
Citation
Anatomy Research International, 2014, v. 2014, article no. 324850 How to Cite?
AbstractIn hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198668
ISSN
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, LKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T08:46:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-07T08:46:41Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnatomy Research International, 2014, v. 2014, article no. 324850en_US
dc.identifier.issn2090-2743-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198668-
dc.description.abstractIn hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ari-
dc.relation.ispartofAnatomy Research Internationalen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe thoracic shape of hominoidsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, LK: lapki@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, LK=rp00536en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2014/324850-
dc.identifier.pmid24818026-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4000967-
dc.identifier.hkuros230105en_US
dc.identifier.volume2014en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats