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Article: Attitudes towards suicide following an undergraduate suicide prevention module: experience of medical students in Hong Kong

TitleAttitudes towards suicide following an undergraduate suicide prevention module: experience of medical students in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2013, v. 19 n. 5, p. 377-385 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To explore qualitative and quantitative changes in attitudes and experiences of medical students following a special study suicide prevention module. DESIGN: Pilot study. SETTING: The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS: A 2-week intensive special studies module was delivered to third- and fourth-year medical students in June 2011. The module was elective and involved several modes of teaching. All students filled the Chinese Attitude toward Suicide Questionnaire before and after the course. They also provided written feedback about the module experience. Three students participated in in-depth interviews. RESULTS: In all, 22 students aged 20 to 23 years enrolled in the special studies module; 15 (68%) of whom were male and only one was married. Positive trends were noted in attitudes towards suicide following the participation in the special studies module, namely, reduced negative appraisal of suicide, reduced stigmatisation of the phenomena, and increased sensitivity to suicide-related facts. Feedback of the students suggested inclusion of this module into the main medical curriculum, increased confidence in dealing with issues related to suicide, and appreciation of skills focusing on interviewing in patients. Overall the module was well received by medical students. CONCLUSIONS: A suicide prevention training module seems to have been valued by students and lead to positive attitudes towards understanding suicide. Adopting this initiative as a suicide prevention strategy warrants further exploration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198568
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYousuf, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeh, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, PWCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T07:56:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-07T07:56:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2013, v. 19 n. 5, p. 377-385en_US
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198568-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To explore qualitative and quantitative changes in attitudes and experiences of medical students following a special study suicide prevention module. DESIGN: Pilot study. SETTING: The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS: A 2-week intensive special studies module was delivered to third- and fourth-year medical students in June 2011. The module was elective and involved several modes of teaching. All students filled the Chinese Attitude toward Suicide Questionnaire before and after the course. They also provided written feedback about the module experience. Three students participated in in-depth interviews. RESULTS: In all, 22 students aged 20 to 23 years enrolled in the special studies module; 15 (68%) of whom were male and only one was married. Positive trends were noted in attitudes towards suicide following the participation in the special studies module, namely, reduced negative appraisal of suicide, reduced stigmatisation of the phenomena, and increased sensitivity to suicide-related facts. Feedback of the students suggested inclusion of this module into the main medical curriculum, increased confidence in dealing with issues related to suicide, and appreciation of skills focusing on interviewing in patients. Overall the module was well received by medical students. CONCLUSIONS: A suicide prevention training module seems to have been valued by students and lead to positive attitudes towards understanding suicide. Adopting this initiative as a suicide prevention strategy warrants further exploration.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_US
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence-
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduate-
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical - psychology-
dc.subject.meshSuicide - prevention and control-
dc.titleAttitudes towards suicide following an undergraduate suicide prevention module: experience of medical students in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBeh, SL: philipbeh@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, PWC: paulw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBeh, SL=rp00409en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, PWC=rp00591en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.12809/hkmj133950en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24088587-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84885149778-
dc.identifier.hkuros229757en_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage377en_US
dc.identifier.epage385en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000325385900003-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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