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Article: Freedom of Speech and Defamation

TitleFreedom of Speech and Defamation
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherNational University of Singapore, Faculty of Law. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.law.nus.edu.sg/sjls
Citation
Singapore Journal of Legal Studies, 1992, p. 542-556 How to Cite?
AbstractThe judgment of the Court of Appeal in what appears to be the latest in a series of significant decisions concerning the former opposition leader Mr. J.B. Jeyaretnam contains pronouncements which have important but disturbing implications for the interpretation and development of the freedom of speech in Singapore and, more generally, for the Constitution of the Republic of Singapore. This note does not hope to deal directly with the law of defamation but with how that branch of tort law is and should be affected by the constitutional entrenchment of the freedom of speech in Singapore. The High Court judgment in this litigation took the position that the constitutional right of free speech was consistent with the common law rules of defamation. More specifically, the implication to be drawn from that first instance judgment seems to be that the common law defences of justification and fair comment sufficiently guarantee the freedom of speech concerning the conduct of public officials in Singapore.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198501
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.119
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHor, MYMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T07:14:11Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-07T07:14:11Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationSingapore Journal of Legal Studies, 1992, p. 542-556en_US
dc.identifier.issn0218-2173en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198501-
dc.description.abstractThe judgment of the Court of Appeal in what appears to be the latest in a series of significant decisions concerning the former opposition leader Mr. J.B. Jeyaretnam contains pronouncements which have important but disturbing implications for the interpretation and development of the freedom of speech in Singapore and, more generally, for the Constitution of the Republic of Singapore. This note does not hope to deal directly with the law of defamation but with how that branch of tort law is and should be affected by the constitutional entrenchment of the freedom of speech in Singapore. The High Court judgment in this litigation took the position that the constitutional right of free speech was consistent with the common law rules of defamation. More specifically, the implication to be drawn from that first instance judgment seems to be that the common law defences of justification and fair comment sufficiently guarantee the freedom of speech concerning the conduct of public officials in Singapore.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNational University of Singapore, Faculty of Law. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.law.nus.edu.sg/sjlsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSingapore Journal of Legal Studiesen_US
dc.titleFreedom of Speech and Defamationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHor, MYM: mhor@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.spage542en_US
dc.identifier.epage556en_US
dc.publisher.placeSingaporeen_US
dc.identifier.ssrn965143-

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