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Article: The Right to Counsel – The Right to be Informed: Attorney-General of Trinidad and Tobago v Whiteman [[1991] 2 WLR 1200]

TitleThe Right to Counsel – The Right to be Informed: Attorney-General of Trinidad and Tobago v Whiteman [[1991] 2 WLR 1200]
Authors
KeywordsConstitutional law
Bill of rights
Civil liberties
Human rights
Right to counsel
Singapore
Trinidad and Tobago
Issue Date1993
PublisherSingapore Academy of Law. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sal.org.sg/SALPublications-Journal.htm
Citation
Singapore Academy of Law Journal, 1993, v. 5, p. 141-147 How to Cite?
AbstractThis slightly belated note on this important decision of the Privy Council on an appeal from the Court of Appeal of Trinidad and Tobago is perhaps excusable because of the continued absence ofjudicial explication in Singapore of the right to counsel. Like Singapore, Trinidad and Tobago has a Westminster-style Constitution and, within it, a constitutionally entrenched right to counsel. Any decision of Privy Council interpreting the content of such a provision must surely be of the highest persuasive value in Singapore. The American detective drama scenario of a policeman clasping handcuffs on a suspect whilst reciting the arrested person’s right to engage a lawyer (amongst other things) is familiar to most of us. This decision of the Privy Council may well lead the way in founding a similar constitutional obligation on the part of the police in Singapore.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198493
ISSN
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHor, MYMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T07:14:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-07T07:14:10Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationSingapore Academy of Law Journal, 1993, v. 5, p. 141-147en_US
dc.identifier.issn0218-2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198493-
dc.description.abstractThis slightly belated note on this important decision of the Privy Council on an appeal from the Court of Appeal of Trinidad and Tobago is perhaps excusable because of the continued absence ofjudicial explication in Singapore of the right to counsel. Like Singapore, Trinidad and Tobago has a Westminster-style Constitution and, within it, a constitutionally entrenched right to counsel. Any decision of Privy Council interpreting the content of such a provision must surely be of the highest persuasive value in Singapore. The American detective drama scenario of a policeman clasping handcuffs on a suspect whilst reciting the arrested person’s right to engage a lawyer (amongst other things) is familiar to most of us. This decision of the Privy Council may well lead the way in founding a similar constitutional obligation on the part of the police in Singapore.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSingapore Academy of Law. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sal.org.sg/SALPublications-Journal.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSingapore Academy of Law Journalen_US
dc.subjectConstitutional law-
dc.subjectBill of rights-
dc.subjectCivil liberties-
dc.subjectHuman rights-
dc.subjectRight to counsel-
dc.subjectSingapore-
dc.subjectTrinidad and Tobago-
dc.titleThe Right to Counsel – The Right to be Informed: Attorney-General of Trinidad and Tobago v Whiteman [[1991] 2 WLR 1200]en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHor, MYM: mhor@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.spage141en_US
dc.identifier.epage147en_US
dc.publisher.placeSingaporeen_US
dc.identifier.ssrn656901-

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