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Book Chapter: The Enlightened Sovereign: Buddhism and Kingship in India and Tibet

TitleThe Enlightened Sovereign: Buddhism and Kingship in India and Tibet
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Citation
The Enlightened Sovereign: Buddhism and Kingship in India and Tibet. In Emmanuel, SM (Ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy, p. 491-511. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractMany Buddhist rulers attained the cultic status of divinity as buddhas or celestial bodhisattvas and were expected to exercise their power in accord with Buddhist principles. The bodhisatta is depicted as perfecting both the virtues of kingship and the virtues of renunciation, thus preparing the way for his supreme enlightenment in which the two strands of sovereignty and renunciation “receive their final synthesis and fulfilment”. Politics was realistically seen as an unavoidable exercise of power that can and ought to be used to promote righteousness, while the philosophical interpretation of Buddhist doctrines reflects the pragmatic nature of Buddhist ethics, which, unlike the deontological and absolutist ethical traditions, allows for the expression of multiple and variant attitudes towards the state and the role of religion in shaping and being shaped by social and political conditions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198315
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHalkias, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T03:01:03Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T03:01:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Enlightened Sovereign: Buddhism and Kingship in India and Tibet. In Emmanuel, SM (Ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy, p. 491-511. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780470658772en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198315-
dc.description.abstractMany Buddhist rulers attained the cultic status of divinity as buddhas or celestial bodhisattvas and were expected to exercise their power in accord with Buddhist principles. The bodhisatta is depicted as perfecting both the virtues of kingship and the virtues of renunciation, thus preparing the way for his supreme enlightenment in which the two strands of sovereignty and renunciation “receive their final synthesis and fulfilment”. Politics was realistically seen as an unavoidable exercise of power that can and ought to be used to promote righteousness, while the philosophical interpretation of Buddhist doctrines reflects the pragmatic nature of Buddhist ethics, which, unlike the deontological and absolutist ethical traditions, allows for the expression of multiple and variant attitudes towards the state and the role of religion in shaping and being shaped by social and political conditions.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.ispartofA Companion to Buddhist Philosophyen_US
dc.titleThe Enlightened Sovereign: Buddhism and Kingship in India and Tibeten_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailHalkias, G: halkias@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHalkias, G=rp01848en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/9781118324004.ch32-
dc.identifier.hkuros229571en_US
dc.identifier.spage491en_US
dc.identifier.epage511en_US
dc.publisher.placeHobokenen_US

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