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Conference Paper: Effect of symmetry on perception of 3D shape from stereo and shading

TitleEffect of symmetry on perception of 3D shape from stereo and shading
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2013
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2013), Naples, FL., 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9 article 261 How to Cite?
AbstractSymmetry has been found to improve 3D shape discrimination across change in viewpoint and lighting. We tested whether this benefit is due to use of symmetry as constraint for interpreting 3D information from stereo and shading. Observers performed sequential 3D shape discrimination of random, smoothly-curved symmetric objects that were rotated in depth by various amounts (0°-60°). We manipulated the 3D information provided by symmetry by varying the orientation of an object’s symmetry plane relative to the direction of viewpoint rotation. Base orientation of the symmetry plane was either horizontal or vertical, and viewpoint rotation was either horizontal or vertical. In Experiment 1, objects were presented in stereo with no shading information. We found that discrimination was better when rotation was perpendicular to the symmetry plane, which causes the symmetry plane to be slanted in depth, than when the rotation was parallel to the symmetry plane, which keeps the symmetry plane aligned with the line of sight. In Experiment 2, objects were presented monocularly with Lambertian shading, and lighting direction was varied from above-left to front-right. Performance was better for objects with a vertical symmetry plane than those with a horizontal symmetry plane with and without viewpoint rotation. In both experiments, symmetry was most advantageous when the constraint imposed by symmetry was complementary to the ambiguity from stereo or shading information.
DescriptionPoster Session - 3D perception: Shape from shading and contours: no. 23.541
This journal issue entitled: Vision Sciences Society Meeting, 2013: Abstracts
Open Access Journal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198219
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, YLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, JAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T02:55:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T02:55:41Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2013), Naples, FL., 10-15 May 2013. In Journal of Vision, 2013, v. 13 n. 9 article 261en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198219-
dc.descriptionPoster Session - 3D perception: Shape from shading and contours: no. 23.541-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue entitled: Vision Sciences Society Meeting, 2013: Abstracts-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.description.abstractSymmetry has been found to improve 3D shape discrimination across change in viewpoint and lighting. We tested whether this benefit is due to use of symmetry as constraint for interpreting 3D information from stereo and shading. Observers performed sequential 3D shape discrimination of random, smoothly-curved symmetric objects that were rotated in depth by various amounts (0°-60°). We manipulated the 3D information provided by symmetry by varying the orientation of an object’s symmetry plane relative to the direction of viewpoint rotation. Base orientation of the symmetry plane was either horizontal or vertical, and viewpoint rotation was either horizontal or vertical. In Experiment 1, objects were presented in stereo with no shading information. We found that discrimination was better when rotation was perpendicular to the symmetry plane, which causes the symmetry plane to be slanted in depth, than when the rotation was parallel to the symmetry plane, which keeps the symmetry plane aligned with the line of sight. In Experiment 2, objects were presented monocularly with Lambertian shading, and lighting direction was varied from above-left to front-right. Performance was better for objects with a vertical symmetry plane than those with a horizontal symmetry plane with and without viewpoint rotation. In both experiments, symmetry was most advantageous when the constraint imposed by symmetry was complementary to the ambiguity from stereo or shading information.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleEffect of symmetry on perception of 3D shape from stereo and shadingen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, YL: younglee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, JA: jsaun@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, YL=rp00866en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/13.9.261-
dc.identifier.hkuros229484en_US
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 140626-

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