File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Development of an animal fracture model for evaluation of cement augmentation femoroplasty: an in vitro biomechanical study

TitleDevelopment of an animal fracture model for evaluation of cement augmentation femoroplasty: an in vitro biomechanical study
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc. Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/overview/bioresearch-open-access/609/
Citation
BioResearch Open Access, 2014, v. 3 n. 2, p. 70-74 How to Cite?
AbstractOsteoporotic hip fracture is the most severe kind of fracture with high morbidity and mortality. Patients' ambulation and quality of life are significantly affected by the fracture because only 50% regain their prefracture functional status, even if they undergo surgeries. There are many issues associated with the current preventive methods e.g., cost, side effects, patient compliance, and time for onset of action. Femoroplasty, the injection of bone cement into the proximal femur to augment femoral strength and to prevent fracture, has been an option with great potential. However, until now femoroplasty has remained at the stage of biomechanical testing. No in vivo study has evaluated its safety and effectiveness; there is not even an animal model for such investigations. The objective of this study was to develop a proximal femur fracture goat model that consistently fractures at the proximal femur when subject to vertical load, simulating osteoporotic hip fractures in human. Six pairs of fresh frozen mature Chinese goats' femora were obtained and randomly assigned into two groups. For the experimental group, a cylindrical bone defect was created at the proximal femur, while the control was left untreated. In addition, a configuration to mimic the mechanical axis of the goat femur was developed. When subjected to load along the mechanical axis, all the specimens from the bone defect group experienced femoral neck fractures, while fractures occurred at the femoral neck or other sites of the proximal femur in the control group. The biomechanical property (failure load) of the bone defect specimens was significantly lower than that of the control specimens (p<0.05). Osteoporotic hip fractures of humans were simulated by a goat fracture model, which may serve as a reference for future femoroplasty studies in vivo. The newly developed configuration simulating a femoral mechanical axis for biomechanical tests was practicable during the study.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198055
ISSN
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, WWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, TWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, FKLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-25T02:43:23Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-25T02:43:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationBioResearch Open Access, 2014, v. 3 n. 2, p. 70-74en_US
dc.identifier.issn2164-7860-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/198055-
dc.description.abstractOsteoporotic hip fracture is the most severe kind of fracture with high morbidity and mortality. Patients' ambulation and quality of life are significantly affected by the fracture because only 50% regain their prefracture functional status, even if they undergo surgeries. There are many issues associated with the current preventive methods e.g., cost, side effects, patient compliance, and time for onset of action. Femoroplasty, the injection of bone cement into the proximal femur to augment femoral strength and to prevent fracture, has been an option with great potential. However, until now femoroplasty has remained at the stage of biomechanical testing. No in vivo study has evaluated its safety and effectiveness; there is not even an animal model for such investigations. The objective of this study was to develop a proximal femur fracture goat model that consistently fractures at the proximal femur when subject to vertical load, simulating osteoporotic hip fractures in human. Six pairs of fresh frozen mature Chinese goats' femora were obtained and randomly assigned into two groups. For the experimental group, a cylindrical bone defect was created at the proximal femur, while the control was left untreated. In addition, a configuration to mimic the mechanical axis of the goat femur was developed. When subjected to load along the mechanical axis, all the specimens from the bone defect group experienced femoral neck fractures, while fractures occurred at the femoral neck or other sites of the proximal femur in the control group. The biomechanical property (failure load) of the bone defect specimens was significantly lower than that of the control specimens (p<0.05). Osteoporotic hip fractures of humans were simulated by a goat fracture model, which may serve as a reference for future femoroplasty studies in vivo. The newly developed configuration simulating a femoral mechanical axis for biomechanical tests was practicable during the study.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc. Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/overview/bioresearch-open-access/609/-
dc.relation.ispartofBioResearch Open Accessen_US
dc.rightsThis is a copy of an article published in the BioResearch Open Access © 2014 copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; BioResearch Open Access is available online at: http://www.liebertonline.com.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDevelopment of an animal fracture model for evaluation of cement augmentation femoroplasty: an in vitro biomechanical studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLu, WW: wwlu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, TW: catcher@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, FKL: klleunga@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLu, WW=rp00411en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, FKL=rp00297en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/biores.2013.0036en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24804167-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3994908-
dc.identifier.hkuros229515en_US
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage70-
dc.identifier.epage74-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats