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Article: Sleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning

TitleSleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://sciencemag.org
Citation
Science, 2014, v. 344 n. 6188, p. 1173-1178 How to Cite?
AbstractHow sleep helps learning and memory remains unknown. We report in mouse motor cortex that sleep after motor learning promotes the formation of postsynaptic dendritic spines on a subset of branches of individual layer V pyramidal neurons. New spines are formed on different sets of dendritic branches in response to different learning tasks and are protected from being eliminated when multiple tasks are learned. Neurons activated during learning of a motor task are reactivated during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep, and disrupting this neuronal reactivation prevents branch-specific spine formation. These findings indicate that sleep has a key role in promoting learning-dependent synapse formation and maintenance on selected dendritic branches, which contribute to memory storage.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197914
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 34.661
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 13.217
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, G-
dc.contributor.authorLai, SW-
dc.contributor.authorCichon, J-
dc.contributor.authorMa, L-
dc.contributor.authorLi, W-
dc.contributor.authorGan, WB-
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T01:50:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-09T01:50:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationScience, 2014, v. 344 n. 6188, p. 1173-1178-
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197914-
dc.description.abstractHow sleep helps learning and memory remains unknown. We report in mouse motor cortex that sleep after motor learning promotes the formation of postsynaptic dendritic spines on a subset of branches of individual layer V pyramidal neurons. New spines are formed on different sets of dendritic branches in response to different learning tasks and are protected from being eliminated when multiple tasks are learned. Neurons activated during learning of a motor task are reactivated during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep, and disrupting this neuronal reactivation prevents branch-specific spine formation. These findings indicate that sleep has a key role in promoting learning-dependent synapse formation and maintenance on selected dendritic branches, which contribute to memory storage.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://sciencemag.org-
dc.relation.ispartofScience-
dc.rightsScience. Copyright © American Association for the Advancement of Science.-
dc.titleSleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, SW: coraswl@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.1249098-
dc.identifier.pmid24904169-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84901824631-
dc.identifier.hkuros240570-
dc.identifier.volume344-
dc.identifier.issue6188-
dc.identifier.spage1173-
dc.identifier.epage1178-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000336791200051-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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