File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Factors contributing to early breast-feeding cessation among Chinese mothers: An exploratory study

TitleFactors contributing to early breast-feeding cessation among Chinese mothers: An exploratory study
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/midw
Citation
Midwifery, 2014, v. 30 n. 10, p. 1088-1095 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground although more than 85% of all new mothers in Hong Kong now initiate breast feeding, few exclusively breast feed and the overall duration is short. More than one-third stop breast feeding within the first month post partum. Objective to explore the breast-feeding experiences of Hong Kong Chinese mothers who prematurely discontinue breast feeding and to identify contributing factors that might be remediated to help women breast feed longer. Design qualitative exploratory study. Methods in-depth, exploratory interviews were carried out with 24 new mothers who stopped breast feeding within one month after birth, and content analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings five core themes emerged from the data: unnatural expectations, left to figure it out, uncertainty, unfulfilling experiences, and guilt versus relief. Because breast feeding is ‘natural’ participants expected that it would come naturally and thus be easy. When breast feeding did not happen naturally, however, midwives were too busy to provide breast-feeding support and mothers were left to figure it out on their own. Participants also reported difficulty in gauging whether the infant was getting adequate nutrition from their breastmilk. Few participants had positive breast-feeding experiences; while the decision to stop breast feeding caused guilt for most participants, others expressed relief at stopping breast feeding. Key conclusions and implications for practice greater postnatal breast-feeding support, both in the hospital and after the mother returns home, would likely increase the mother׳s confidence and enhance her mothering experience. Further antenatal and postnatal education on the realistic breast-feeding expectations and the amount of breastmilk required by babies is also important. More research is needed to test professional and peer support breast-feeding interventions to provide guidance to policy makers on the most effective breast-feeding support strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197906

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodgson, JEen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, KMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-02T15:25:22Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-02T15:25:22Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationMidwifery, 2014, v. 30 n. 10, p. 1088-1095en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197906-
dc.description.abstractBackground although more than 85% of all new mothers in Hong Kong now initiate breast feeding, few exclusively breast feed and the overall duration is short. More than one-third stop breast feeding within the first month post partum. Objective to explore the breast-feeding experiences of Hong Kong Chinese mothers who prematurely discontinue breast feeding and to identify contributing factors that might be remediated to help women breast feed longer. Design qualitative exploratory study. Methods in-depth, exploratory interviews were carried out with 24 new mothers who stopped breast feeding within one month after birth, and content analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings five core themes emerged from the data: unnatural expectations, left to figure it out, uncertainty, unfulfilling experiences, and guilt versus relief. Because breast feeding is ‘natural’ participants expected that it would come naturally and thus be easy. When breast feeding did not happen naturally, however, midwives were too busy to provide breast-feeding support and mothers were left to figure it out on their own. Participants also reported difficulty in gauging whether the infant was getting adequate nutrition from their breastmilk. Few participants had positive breast-feeding experiences; while the decision to stop breast feeding caused guilt for most participants, others expressed relief at stopping breast feeding. Key conclusions and implications for practice greater postnatal breast-feeding support, both in the hospital and after the mother returns home, would likely increase the mother׳s confidence and enhance her mothering experience. Further antenatal and postnatal education on the realistic breast-feeding expectations and the amount of breastmilk required by babies is also important. More research is needed to test professional and peer support breast-feeding interventions to provide guidance to policy makers on the most effective breast-feeding support strategies.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/midw-
dc.relation.ispartofMidwiferyen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Midwifery. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Midwifery, 2014, v. 30 n. 10, p. 1088-1095. DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2014.03.002-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleFactors contributing to early breast-feeding cessation among Chinese mothers: An exploratory studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, AM: tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, KM: kendrawu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, AM=rp00461en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.midw.2014.03.002en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros229114en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros235664-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats