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Article: Optimal design of studies of influenza transmission in households. II: Comparison between cohort and case-ascertained studies

TitleOptimal design of studies of influenza transmission in households. II: Comparison between cohort and case-ascertained studies
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=HYG
Citation
Epidemiology and Infection, 2014, v. 142 n. 4, p. 744–752 How to Cite?
AbstractBoth case-ascertained household studies, in which households are recruited after an 'index case' is identified, and household cohort studies, where a household is enrolled before the start of the epidemic, may be used to test and estimate the protective effect of interventions used to prevent influenza transmission. A simulation approach parameterized with empirical data from household studies was used to evaluate and compare the statistical power of four study designs: a cohort study with routine virological testing of household contacts of infected index case, a cohort study where only household contacts with acute respiratory illness (ARI) are sampled for virological testing, a case-ascertained study with routine virological testing of household contacts, and a case-ascertained study where only household contacts with ARI are sampled for virological testing. We found that a case-ascertained study with ARI-triggered testing would be the most powerful design while a cohort design only testing household contacts with ARI was the least powerful. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that these conclusions varied by model parameters including the serial interval and the risk of influenza virus infection from outside the household.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197900
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.515
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.320
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKlick, BA-
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, H-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-02T15:25:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-02T15:25:19Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology and Infection, 2014, v. 142 n. 4, p. 744–752-
dc.identifier.issn0950-2688-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197900-
dc.description.abstractBoth case-ascertained household studies, in which households are recruited after an 'index case' is identified, and household cohort studies, where a household is enrolled before the start of the epidemic, may be used to test and estimate the protective effect of interventions used to prevent influenza transmission. A simulation approach parameterized with empirical data from household studies was used to evaluate and compare the statistical power of four study designs: a cohort study with routine virological testing of household contacts of infected index case, a cohort study where only household contacts with acute respiratory illness (ARI) are sampled for virological testing, a case-ascertained study with routine virological testing of household contacts, and a case-ascertained study where only household contacts with ARI are sampled for virological testing. We found that a case-ascertained study with ARI-triggered testing would be the most powerful design while a cohort design only testing household contacts with ARI was the least powerful. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that these conclusions varied by model parameters including the serial interval and the risk of influenza virus infection from outside the household.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=HYG-
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiology and Infection-
dc.rightsEpidemiology and Infection. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Research Design-
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - transmission-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - transmission-
dc.titleOptimal design of studies of influenza transmission in households. II: Comparison between cohort and case-ascertained studies-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H: nishiura@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268813001623-
dc.identifier.pmid23830470-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3883904-
dc.identifier.hkuros229086-
dc.identifier.volume142-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage744-
dc.identifier.epage752-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000337709300009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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