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Conference Paper: A Preliminary Examination of the Concept of Altruism as an Aim of Education

TitleA Preliminary Examination of the Concept of Altruism as an Aim of Education
Authors
Keywordsaltruism
values education
citizenship education
global citizenship
social justice
Issue Date2013
PublisherPhilosophy of Education Society of Australasia.
Citation
The 43rd Annual Conference of Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA), Melbourne, Australia, 6-9 December 2013. In the Abstracts of the 43rd Annual Conference of PESA, 2013, p. 111, abstract no. 28a How to Cite?
AbstractMany are concerned with education’s role in preparing societies to meet challenges related to globalization. Among various educational aims related to globalization is that of developing in young people a critical awareness of the lives of disadvantaged people, in their communities and across the world, to become compassionate, or socially responsible, ‘global citizens’. This general interest is shared by policy makers envisioning global or twenty-first century citizenship education, as well as by philosophers of education and social justiceoriented teachers. However, the aim of such education or its most appropriate pedagogy or schooling context is not always spelled out, owing to the controversial nature of various interpretations and recommendations related to poverty and injustice today (i.e., economic redistribution versus austerity; privatisation versus socialism). In this essay, I ask whether altruism can be usefully elaborated as an educational aim for global citizenship and social responsibility. First, I examine philosophical treatments of altruism such as by Thomas Nagel and Lawrence Blum, and consider the educational implications of significant features of a useful definition of the concept. Next, I juxtapose these views with those of Confucian and Buddhist scholars, to consider whether a universal value of altruism for contexts of west and east is plausible. Finally, I apply my conceptualization of altruism to Hong Kong curriculum, providing a concrete context for considering altruism as a useful educational aim. I end by highlighting the tension of teaching for altruism in settings (unlike Hong Kong) where moral education is contentious, while citizenship education is not.
DescriptionConference theme: Measuring Up in Education
Parallel Session 28
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197879

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJackson, EJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-02T15:22:24Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-02T15:22:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 43rd Annual Conference of Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA), Melbourne, Australia, 6-9 December 2013. In the Abstracts of the 43rd Annual Conference of PESA, 2013, p. 111, abstract no. 28aen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197879-
dc.descriptionConference theme: Measuring Up in Education-
dc.descriptionParallel Session 28-
dc.description.abstractMany are concerned with education’s role in preparing societies to meet challenges related to globalization. Among various educational aims related to globalization is that of developing in young people a critical awareness of the lives of disadvantaged people, in their communities and across the world, to become compassionate, or socially responsible, ‘global citizens’. This general interest is shared by policy makers envisioning global or twenty-first century citizenship education, as well as by philosophers of education and social justiceoriented teachers. However, the aim of such education or its most appropriate pedagogy or schooling context is not always spelled out, owing to the controversial nature of various interpretations and recommendations related to poverty and injustice today (i.e., economic redistribution versus austerity; privatisation versus socialism). In this essay, I ask whether altruism can be usefully elaborated as an educational aim for global citizenship and social responsibility. First, I examine philosophical treatments of altruism such as by Thomas Nagel and Lawrence Blum, and consider the educational implications of significant features of a useful definition of the concept. Next, I juxtapose these views with those of Confucian and Buddhist scholars, to consider whether a universal value of altruism for contexts of west and east is plausible. Finally, I apply my conceptualization of altruism to Hong Kong curriculum, providing a concrete context for considering altruism as a useful educational aim. I end by highlighting the tension of teaching for altruism in settings (unlike Hong Kong) where moral education is contentious, while citizenship education is not.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPhilosophy of Education Society of Australasia.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Conference of Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectaltruism-
dc.subjectvalues education-
dc.subjectcitizenship education-
dc.subjectglobal citizenship-
dc.subjectsocial justice-
dc.titleA Preliminary Examination of the Concept of Altruism as an Aim of Educationen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailJackson, EJ: lizjackson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJackson, EJ=rp01633en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros229066en_US
dc.identifier.spage111, abstract no. 28a-
dc.identifier.epage111, abstract no. 28a-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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