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Conference Paper: Comparing Illness Presentation, Treatment and Functioning between Patients with Early- and Adult-onset Psychosis

TitleComparing Illness Presentation, Treatment and Functioning between Patients with Early- and Adult-onset Psychosis
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
The 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 5-9 April 2014. In Schizophrenia Research, 2014, v. 153 suppl. 1, p. S263-S264, Poster no. M202 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Early studies have shown that patients with early- and adult-onset schizophrenia differ in their illness presentation, psychopathology, pre-morbid traits and prognosis. Whether adult-onset schizophrenia represents a separate entity distinct from early-onset schizophrenia is yet uncertain. Therefore, the current study aimed at characterizing and contrasting adult-onset patients with an early-onset cohort in their basic demographics, illness presentation, treatment and functional level. METHODS: Participants were recruited from two territory-wide early intervention services for early-onset (n=671; from the Early Assessment Service for Young People with Psychosis Program, EASY) and late-onset psychosis patients (n=360; from the Jockey Club Early Psychosis Project, JCEP) in Hong Kong. Patients from the early-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode during 2001 and 2003; data were then collected retrospectively by systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was prospectively recruited as part of a larger interventional study during 2009 and 2011; information was collected prospectively via face-to-face interviews with patients. RESULTS: At baseline, adult-onset psychosis (mean of 36.6 years old) was significantly associated with more females, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning level, fewer smokers, fewer with schizophrenia than early-onset psychosis (mean of 20.4 years old), better medication adherence and more psychiatric hospitalization. No significant group differences in duration of untreated psychosis were found. DISCUSSION: Managing psychotic illnesses optimally is an important challenge in health care delivery. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that early-onset psychosis and adult-onset psychosis share a similar prognostic trajectory. There is a need to adapt intervention processes, specifically for patients recovering from a first episode illness, in particular for early- and adult-onset, as they may face different unique sets of challenges.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Abstracts of the 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197869
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, HMEen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-02T15:20:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-02T15:20:39Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 5-9 April 2014. In Schizophrenia Research, 2014, v. 153 suppl. 1, p. S263-S264, Poster no. M202en_US
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197869-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Abstracts of the 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Early studies have shown that patients with early- and adult-onset schizophrenia differ in their illness presentation, psychopathology, pre-morbid traits and prognosis. Whether adult-onset schizophrenia represents a separate entity distinct from early-onset schizophrenia is yet uncertain. Therefore, the current study aimed at characterizing and contrasting adult-onset patients with an early-onset cohort in their basic demographics, illness presentation, treatment and functional level. METHODS: Participants were recruited from two territory-wide early intervention services for early-onset (n=671; from the Early Assessment Service for Young People with Psychosis Program, EASY) and late-onset psychosis patients (n=360; from the Jockey Club Early Psychosis Project, JCEP) in Hong Kong. Patients from the early-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode during 2001 and 2003; data were then collected retrospectively by systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was prospectively recruited as part of a larger interventional study during 2009 and 2011; information was collected prospectively via face-to-face interviews with patients. RESULTS: At baseline, adult-onset psychosis (mean of 36.6 years old) was significantly associated with more females, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning level, fewer smokers, fewer with schizophrenia than early-onset psychosis (mean of 20.4 years old), better medication adherence and more psychiatric hospitalization. No significant group differences in duration of untreated psychosis were found. DISCUSSION: Managing psychotic illnesses optimally is an important challenge in health care delivery. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that early-onset psychosis and adult-onset psychosis share a similar prognostic trajectory. There is a need to adapt intervention processes, specifically for patients recovering from a first episode illness, in particular for early- and adult-onset, as they may face different unique sets of challenges.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_US
dc.titleComparing Illness Presentation, Treatment and Functioning between Patients with Early- and Adult-onset Psychosisen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: kwsherry@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KW=rp00539en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0920-9964(14)70752-2-
dc.identifier.hkuros229037en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros249086-
dc.identifier.volume153en_US
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1en_US
dc.identifier.spageS263, Poster no. M202en_US
dc.identifier.epageS264en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US

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