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Article: Challenges to the Global Concept of Student-Centered Learning with Special Reference to the United Arab Emirates: ‘Never fail a Nahayan’

TitleChallenges to the Global Concept of Student-Centered Learning with Special Reference to the United Arab Emirates: ‘Never fail a Nahayan’
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherPhilosophy of Education Society of Australasia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EPAT
Citation
Educational Philosophy and Theory (In press), 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractStudent-centered learning has been conceived as a Western export to the East and the developing world in the last few decades. Philosophers of education often associate student-centered learning with frameworks related to meeting the needs of individual pupils: from Deweyan experiential learning, to the ‘pedagogy of the oppressed’ and other social justice orientations. Yet student-centered learning has also become, in the era of neoliberal education, a jingoistic advertisement for practices and ideologies which can be seen to lead to a global devaluation of the educational profession, and the bolstering of the view of the student as a customer. In this article, I want to disentangle these views and explore some limitations of either model of student-centered learning. To add context, I consider education in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) today, which provides an extreme example of the risks involved with prioritizing student’s self-identified needs and interests above all else, as in an idealized or exaggerated student-centered concept. I conclude with brief comments on amending the philosophical concept of student-centered learning to be useful in diverse contexts today.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197860

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJackson, EJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-02T15:17:55Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-02T15:17:55Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationEducational Philosophy and Theory (In press), 2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197860-
dc.description.abstractStudent-centered learning has been conceived as a Western export to the East and the developing world in the last few decades. Philosophers of education often associate student-centered learning with frameworks related to meeting the needs of individual pupils: from Deweyan experiential learning, to the ‘pedagogy of the oppressed’ and other social justice orientations. Yet student-centered learning has also become, in the era of neoliberal education, a jingoistic advertisement for practices and ideologies which can be seen to lead to a global devaluation of the educational profession, and the bolstering of the view of the student as a customer. In this article, I want to disentangle these views and explore some limitations of either model of student-centered learning. To add context, I consider education in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) today, which provides an extreme example of the risks involved with prioritizing student’s self-identified needs and interests above all else, as in an idealized or exaggerated student-centered concept. I conclude with brief comments on amending the philosophical concept of student-centered learning to be useful in diverse contexts today.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPhilosophy of Education Society of Australasia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EPATen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEducational Philosophy and Theoryen_US
dc.titleChallenges to the Global Concept of Student-Centered Learning with Special Reference to the United Arab Emirates: ‘Never fail a Nahayan’en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJackson, EJ: lizjackson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJackson, EJ=rp01633en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00131857.2014.901161en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros229064en_US
dc.identifier.volume46en_US

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