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Article: Multicultural or Intercultural Education in Hong Kong?

TitleMulticultural or Intercultural Education in Hong Kong?
Authors
KeywordsMulticulturalism
Interculturalism
Diversity
Ethnic minorities
Hong Kong
Issue Date2013
PublisherComparative Education Society of Hong Kong. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fe.hku.hk/cerc/ceshk/index_journal.html
Citation
International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, 2013, v. 15 n. 2, p. 99-111 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough multiculturalism in education has become dominant in many societies, Hong Kong does not have a tradition of multicultural education. This paper asks whether and how multicultural education, or a new variant, “interculturalism,” might be usefully employed in considering diversity and inequality in Hong Kong education. After giving a brief overview of multiculturalism and interculturalism in education, the paper examines the needs of Newly Arrived Students (NAS) from mainland China and ethnic minorities to receive greater educational representation through content integration, and interventions to increase student empowerment and reduce prejudice (in line with a multicultural approach). However, students can also benefit from programs labeled as “intercultural” today: linguistic interventions that assimilate students to dominant languages used for work and equal opportunity in society. The paper compares Hong Kong’s challenges with those of other countries that employ multicultural and/or intercultural education programs, Canada, the United States, France, Japan, and South Africa, and also considers educational implications of the latest Moral and National Education controversy, to argue for the need for a more active role for multiculturalism and interculturalism in Hong Kong education today.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197858
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJackson, EJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-02T15:17:54Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-02T15:17:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Comparative Education and Development, 2013, v. 15 n. 2, p. 99-111en_US
dc.identifier.issn1992-4283-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197858-
dc.description.abstractAlthough multiculturalism in education has become dominant in many societies, Hong Kong does not have a tradition of multicultural education. This paper asks whether and how multicultural education, or a new variant, “interculturalism,” might be usefully employed in considering diversity and inequality in Hong Kong education. After giving a brief overview of multiculturalism and interculturalism in education, the paper examines the needs of Newly Arrived Students (NAS) from mainland China and ethnic minorities to receive greater educational representation through content integration, and interventions to increase student empowerment and reduce prejudice (in line with a multicultural approach). However, students can also benefit from programs labeled as “intercultural” today: linguistic interventions that assimilate students to dominant languages used for work and equal opportunity in society. The paper compares Hong Kong’s challenges with those of other countries that employ multicultural and/or intercultural education programs, Canada, the United States, France, Japan, and South Africa, and also considers educational implications of the latest Moral and National Education controversy, to argue for the need for a more active role for multiculturalism and interculturalism in Hong Kong education today.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherComparative Education Society of Hong Kong. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fe.hku.hk/cerc/ceshk/index_journal.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Comparative Education and Developmenten_US
dc.subjectMulticulturalism-
dc.subjectInterculturalism-
dc.subjectDiversity-
dc.subjectEthnic minorities-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.titleMulticultural or Intercultural Education in Hong Kong?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJackson, EJ: lizjackson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJackson, EJ=rp01633en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros229061en_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage99en_US
dc.identifier.epage111en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_US

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