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Conference Paper: Reward learning impairment in patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

TitleReward learning impairment in patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
The 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 5-9 April 2014. In Schizophrenia Research, 2014, v. 153 suppl. 1, p. S220, poster no. M84 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence indicated that schizophrenia patients exhibited reward learning impairment. Nonetheless, most previous studies focused on chronically-ill patients who had longstanding exposure to antipsychotic medication treatment which may interfere with reward processing. In this study, we aimed to investigate reward learning impairment (gradual reinforcement learning) in patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder with particular focus on its relationship with a key negative symptom sub-domain, namely avolition. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with first-episode DSM-IV schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder or schizoaffective disorder (treated with antipsychotic for 3-6 months) and 33 healthy controls matched with age, sex and educational level were recruited. Each subject completed a computerized Go/No Go task, in which they had to decide whether or not to choose each stimulus which had different reinforcement probabilities. The task comprised 3 training blocks and 1 transfer phase presenting novel combinations of previously learned stimuli. A battery of cognitive assessments was administered to patients and HC. Patients were assessed with symptom severity using PANSS and SANS (for negative symptoms). Data on antipsychotic medication treatment was obtained. Omnibus repeated measures ANOVA and one-way ANOVAs were used to compare gradual reinforcement learning performance of patients and HC. Spearman’s correlational analyses were used to examine the association between reinforcement learning deficit and symptom dimensions. RESULTS: Patients did not differ from HC in terms of age (P: mean: 24.81, SD: 7.42; HC: mean: 23.68, SD: 7.49), sex (P: male: 42%; HC: male:47%) and years of education (P: mean: 12.48, SD: 2.67; HC: mean: 12.70, SD: 2.73). HC had significantly higher IQ estimate and better overall cognitive functions than patients. Regarding gradual reinforcement learning performance, patients had significantly lower accuracy in positive stimuli in training blocks 2 (F(1,62) = 6.25, p<0.05) and 3 (F(1,62) = 8.00, P<0.05). Patients also had longer reaction time to positive stimuli in training blocks 2 (F(1,62) = 9.22, P<0.05) and 3 (F(1,62) = 4.70, P<0.05). Avolition score (derived from Avolition-Asociality global sum score of SANS) negatively correlated with positive stimuli’s accuracy in transfer phase (r(31)=−0.48, p<0.01). DISCUSSION: The findings of this study indicated that gradual reinforcement learning deficit (esp. positive reinforcement dysfunction) was found in the initial stage of schizophrenia and was associated with severity of volitional impairment. Further prospective research is required to clarify longitudinal course of reward leaning impairment and its relationship with outcome on symptoms and functioning.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Abstracts of the 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197704
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, CWTen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorGold, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWaltz, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, HMEen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-29T08:43:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-29T08:43:28Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 5-9 April 2014. In Schizophrenia Research, 2014, v. 153 suppl. 1, p. S220, poster no. M84en_US
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197704-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Abstracts of the 4th Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence indicated that schizophrenia patients exhibited reward learning impairment. Nonetheless, most previous studies focused on chronically-ill patients who had longstanding exposure to antipsychotic medication treatment which may interfere with reward processing. In this study, we aimed to investigate reward learning impairment (gradual reinforcement learning) in patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder with particular focus on its relationship with a key negative symptom sub-domain, namely avolition. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with first-episode DSM-IV schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder or schizoaffective disorder (treated with antipsychotic for 3-6 months) and 33 healthy controls matched with age, sex and educational level were recruited. Each subject completed a computerized Go/No Go task, in which they had to decide whether or not to choose each stimulus which had different reinforcement probabilities. The task comprised 3 training blocks and 1 transfer phase presenting novel combinations of previously learned stimuli. A battery of cognitive assessments was administered to patients and HC. Patients were assessed with symptom severity using PANSS and SANS (for negative symptoms). Data on antipsychotic medication treatment was obtained. Omnibus repeated measures ANOVA and one-way ANOVAs were used to compare gradual reinforcement learning performance of patients and HC. Spearman’s correlational analyses were used to examine the association between reinforcement learning deficit and symptom dimensions. RESULTS: Patients did not differ from HC in terms of age (P: mean: 24.81, SD: 7.42; HC: mean: 23.68, SD: 7.49), sex (P: male: 42%; HC: male:47%) and years of education (P: mean: 12.48, SD: 2.67; HC: mean: 12.70, SD: 2.73). HC had significantly higher IQ estimate and better overall cognitive functions than patients. Regarding gradual reinforcement learning performance, patients had significantly lower accuracy in positive stimuli in training blocks 2 (F(1,62) = 6.25, p<0.05) and 3 (F(1,62) = 8.00, P<0.05). Patients also had longer reaction time to positive stimuli in training blocks 2 (F(1,62) = 9.22, P<0.05) and 3 (F(1,62) = 4.70, P<0.05). Avolition score (derived from Avolition-Asociality global sum score of SANS) negatively correlated with positive stimuli’s accuracy in transfer phase (r(31)=−0.48, p<0.01). DISCUSSION: The findings of this study indicated that gradual reinforcement learning deficit (esp. positive reinforcement dysfunction) was found in the initial stage of schizophrenia and was associated with severity of volitional impairment. Further prospective research is required to clarify longitudinal course of reward leaning impairment and its relationship with outcome on symptoms and functioning.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres-
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_US
dc.titleReward learning impairment in patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorderen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: kwsherry@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KW=rp00539en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0920-9964(14)70634-6-
dc.identifier.hkuros229004en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros249082-
dc.identifier.volume153en_US
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1en_US
dc.identifier.spageS220, poster no. M84en_US
dc.identifier.epageS220, poster no. M84en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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