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Article: Silk Road and Early Buddhist Scribal Culture in China (3-5 C)

TitleSilk Road and Early Buddhist Scribal Culture in China (3-5 C)
Authors
KeywordsBuddhist manuscripts
Scribes
Calligraphy
Dunhuang
Turfan
Issue Date2013
PublisherBuddhist College of Singapore. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bcs.edu.sg/
Citation
新加坡佛学研究学刊, 2013, v. 1, p. 63-107 How to Cite?
Singaporean Journal of Buddhist Studies, 2013, v. 1, p. 63-107 How to Cite?
AbstractThe earliest existing Chinese Buddhist manuscript found in the world, the Buddhasaṃgīti-sūtra, was excavated at Toyuq in Turfan, and was dated the sixth year of Yuankang 元康六年(296 CE), in the Western Jin. It was a copy by Dharmarakṣa’s (384-433) monk disciple Zhu Fashou 竺法首. (Figure1, 1a) Who was one of the distinctive Buddhist scribes in Dharmarakśa 竺法护 translation team. During the period when Buddhism was initially transmitted into China, historical documentation and archaeological findings both demonstrated the sacred Buddhist writing by Buddhist monk scribes from Central Asia played a key role in transmission of Buddhism without borders. It also enhanced producing the diversity and vigorous calligraphic styles in China during 3rd to 5th century. However, before the 20th century, early Buddhist scribes or foreign calligraphers were unknown in history of Chinese calligraphy or official records. This paper aims to examine the early sacred writing culture with a broader and more in-depth study of the extent and nature of the role of the Central Asian Buddhist scribes, as well as the significance of their calligraphic expertise to the history of Chinese calligraphers and calligraphy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197669
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsui, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-29T08:38:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-29T08:38:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citation新加坡佛学研究学刊, 2013, v. 1, p. 63-107en_US
dc.identifier.citationSingaporean Journal of Buddhist Studies, 2013, v. 1, p. 63-107-
dc.identifier.issn2345-7406-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197669-
dc.description.abstractThe earliest existing Chinese Buddhist manuscript found in the world, the Buddhasaṃgīti-sūtra, was excavated at Toyuq in Turfan, and was dated the sixth year of Yuankang 元康六年(296 CE), in the Western Jin. It was a copy by Dharmarakṣa’s (384-433) monk disciple Zhu Fashou 竺法首. (Figure1, 1a) Who was one of the distinctive Buddhist scribes in Dharmarakśa 竺法护 translation team. During the period when Buddhism was initially transmitted into China, historical documentation and archaeological findings both demonstrated the sacred Buddhist writing by Buddhist monk scribes from Central Asia played a key role in transmission of Buddhism without borders. It also enhanced producing the diversity and vigorous calligraphic styles in China during 3rd to 5th century. However, before the 20th century, early Buddhist scribes or foreign calligraphers were unknown in history of Chinese calligraphy or official records. This paper aims to examine the early sacred writing culture with a broader and more in-depth study of the extent and nature of the role of the Central Asian Buddhist scribes, as well as the significance of their calligraphic expertise to the history of Chinese calligraphers and calligraphy.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBuddhist College of Singapore. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bcs.edu.sg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartof新加坡佛学研究学刊en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSingaporean Journal of Buddhist Studies-
dc.subjectBuddhist manuscripts-
dc.subjectScribes-
dc.subjectCalligraphy-
dc.subjectDunhuang-
dc.subjectTurfan-
dc.titleSilk Road and Early Buddhist Scribal Culture in China (3-5 C)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTsui, C: chunghui@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros228796en_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.spage63en_US
dc.identifier.epage107en_US
dc.publisher.placeSingaporeen_US

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