File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Investigating consistency and orthographic neighbourhood density effects in Chinese character processing

TitleInvestigating consistency and orthographic neighbourhood density effects in Chinese character processing
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Matthews, SJ
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Wong, L. [王良慧]. (2012). Investigating consistency and orthographic neighbourhood density effects in Chinese character processing. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5186494
AbstractWith about 90% of all characters in a Chinese dictionary belonging to the semantic-phonetic compound category, Chinese orthography is really more phonetic than logographic. Previous studies have shown that regularity and consistency in the phonetic radical facilitate lexical access of phonetic compound characters. These findings are in line with the literature on lexical access of alphabetic languages, suggesting that phonology plays a common role in the process of visual word recognition across orthographies. The contradictory orthographic neighbourhood density effects found in Chinese and English studies, however, challenge the universal applicability of current models of lexical access. This paper reports an empirical study which investigates regularity, consistency and orthographic neighbourhood density effects on the reading and naming of traditional Chinese phonetic compound characters based on Cantonese phonology. Results showed that by manipulating regularity and consistency at the body rime level, a facilitatory orthographic neighbourhood density effect could be found in lexical decision but not naming. The implication is that regularity and consistency at the level of rime (in addition to the syllable level) is functional in Chinese reading. It also suggests that the body rime might have a general role in lexical access across languages. These findings are interpreted within the connectionist and dual-route models of lexical access.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectWord recognition
Reading
Dept/ProgramLinguistics
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197118

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorMatthews, SJ-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Leung-wai-
dc.contributor.author王良慧-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-07T23:15:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-07T23:15:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationWong, L. [王良慧]. (2012). Investigating consistency and orthographic neighbourhood density effects in Chinese character processing. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5186494-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/197118-
dc.description.abstractWith about 90% of all characters in a Chinese dictionary belonging to the semantic-phonetic compound category, Chinese orthography is really more phonetic than logographic. Previous studies have shown that regularity and consistency in the phonetic radical facilitate lexical access of phonetic compound characters. These findings are in line with the literature on lexical access of alphabetic languages, suggesting that phonology plays a common role in the process of visual word recognition across orthographies. The contradictory orthographic neighbourhood density effects found in Chinese and English studies, however, challenge the universal applicability of current models of lexical access. This paper reports an empirical study which investigates regularity, consistency and orthographic neighbourhood density effects on the reading and naming of traditional Chinese phonetic compound characters based on Cantonese phonology. Results showed that by manipulating regularity and consistency at the body rime level, a facilitatory orthographic neighbourhood density effect could be found in lexical decision but not naming. The implication is that regularity and consistency at the level of rime (in addition to the syllable level) is functional in Chinese reading. It also suggests that the body rime might have a general role in lexical access across languages. These findings are interpreted within the connectionist and dual-route models of lexical access.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshWord recognition-
dc.subject.lcshReading-
dc.titleInvestigating consistency and orthographic neighbourhood density effects in Chinese character processing-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5186494-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineLinguistics-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5186494-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats