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Article: Analgesic Effect of Electroacupuncture in Postthoracotomy Pain: A Prospective Randomized Trial

TitleAnalgesic Effect of Electroacupuncture in Postthoracotomy Pain: A Prospective Randomized Trial
Authors
Issue Date2006
Citation
Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 2006, v. 81 n. 6, p. 2031-2036 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The role of electroacupuncture in postthoracotomy pain control is uncertain. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the role of electroacupuncture in the management of early postthoracotomy wound pain. Methods: A total of 27 patients with operable non-small cell lung carcinoma who received thoracotomy were recruited and randomized to receive either electroacupuncture or sham acupuncture in addition to routine oral analgesics and patient-controlled intravenous analgesia for postoperative pain control. All patients received acupuncture twice daily with visual analog pain score recorded for the first 7 postoperative days. Specific chest acupoints (LI 4, GB 34, GB 36, and TE 8) were targeted. Patient-controlled analgesia was used for the first 3 postoperative days in all patients, and the cumulative dosage used was recorded. Results: Two patients were excluded after randomization because of complications unrelated to acupuncture. Interventions and data collection were completed for the remaining 25 patients (13 in the electroacupuncture group; 12 in the sham acupuncture group). There was a trend for lower visual analog scale pain scores in the electro-acupuncture group between postoperative days 2 and 6, although this did not reach statistical significance. The cumulative dose of patient-controlled analgesia morphine used on postoperative day 2 was significantly lower in the electroacupuncture group (7.5 ± 5 mg versus 15.6 ± 12 mg; p < 0.05). Such delay of onset of pain control may be related to the frequency of electroacupuncture used. Conclusions: Electroacupuncture may reduce narcotic analgesic usage in the early postoperative period. A prospective randomized controlled trial using different electroacupuncture frequency is warranted to verify this benefit. © 2006 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196672
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.975
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.490
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, RHL-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TW-
dc.contributor.authorSihoe, ADL-
dc.contributor.authorWan, IYP-
dc.contributor.authorNg, CSH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKC-
dc.contributor.authorWong, WWL-
dc.contributor.authorLiang, YM-
dc.contributor.authorYim, APC-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-24T02:10:32Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-24T02:10:32Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of Thoracic Surgery, 2006, v. 81 n. 6, p. 2031-2036-
dc.identifier.issn0003-4975-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196672-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The role of electroacupuncture in postthoracotomy pain control is uncertain. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the role of electroacupuncture in the management of early postthoracotomy wound pain. Methods: A total of 27 patients with operable non-small cell lung carcinoma who received thoracotomy were recruited and randomized to receive either electroacupuncture or sham acupuncture in addition to routine oral analgesics and patient-controlled intravenous analgesia for postoperative pain control. All patients received acupuncture twice daily with visual analog pain score recorded for the first 7 postoperative days. Specific chest acupoints (LI 4, GB 34, GB 36, and TE 8) were targeted. Patient-controlled analgesia was used for the first 3 postoperative days in all patients, and the cumulative dosage used was recorded. Results: Two patients were excluded after randomization because of complications unrelated to acupuncture. Interventions and data collection were completed for the remaining 25 patients (13 in the electroacupuncture group; 12 in the sham acupuncture group). There was a trend for lower visual analog scale pain scores in the electro-acupuncture group between postoperative days 2 and 6, although this did not reach statistical significance. The cumulative dose of patient-controlled analgesia morphine used on postoperative day 2 was significantly lower in the electroacupuncture group (7.5 ± 5 mg versus 15.6 ± 12 mg; p < 0.05). Such delay of onset of pain control may be related to the frequency of electroacupuncture used. Conclusions: Electroacupuncture may reduce narcotic analgesic usage in the early postoperative period. A prospective randomized controlled trial using different electroacupuncture frequency is warranted to verify this benefit. © 2006 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Thoracic Surgery-
dc.titleAnalgesic Effect of Electroacupuncture in Postthoracotomy Pain: A Prospective Randomized Trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.athoracsur.2005.12.064-
dc.identifier.pmid16731125-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646822958-
dc.identifier.volume81-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage2031-
dc.identifier.epage2036-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238027600014-

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