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Article: Incidence of chest wall paresthesia after video-assisted thoracic surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax

TitleIncidence of chest wall paresthesia after video-assisted thoracic surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax
Authors
Issue Date2004
Citation
European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery, 2004, v. 25 n. 6, p. 1054-1058 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is an established treatment for recurrent or complicated primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). However, a proportion of patients still complains of chronic pain or discomfort after VATS pleurodesis. We aimed to investigate if paresthesia is a distinct component of the post-operative discomfort in patients receiving VATS for PSP. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted with 52 patients who had received VATS pleurodesis for PSP in our institute during a defined 24 month period. A standardized questionnaire was used to identify paresthetic discomforts which the patients themselves could distinguish from their wound pain. Responses were obtained from 51 patients (42 male, 9 female) with a mean age of 24.1 years (range 14-63 years), giving a response rate of 98.0%. Results: With a median observation time of 19 months (range 2-24 months), 27 patients (52.9%) reported experiencing paresthesia as a post-operative complication distinct from their wound pain. The most commonly described characteristics of the paresthesia were 'pins and needles' (37.0%), 'numbness' (25.9%) or a sensation of abnormal 'swelling' in the chest wall (11.1%). Although only two of the affected patients (7.4%) described the paresthesia as 'severe', consequent functional disturbances in daily life were noted by seven patients (25.9%), and 11 patients (40.7%) actively sought medical or alternative, holistic therapies to relieve the paresthesia. Eight (21.0%) of the 38 patients followed-up for over 12 months after surgery still experienced the paresthesia. Conclusions: Although it should not detract from the proven advantages of VATS, paresthesia in the chest wall represents a distinct but previously overlooked post-VATS complication. It is a potential source of significant post-operative morbidity, and may run a chronic course in some patients. Further study is warranted to elucidate its mechanisms and optimum management. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196663
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.803
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.568
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSihoe, ADL-
dc.contributor.authorAu, SSW-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ML-
dc.contributor.authorChow, IKL-
dc.contributor.authorChu, KM-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CY-
dc.contributor.authorWan, M-
dc.contributor.authorYim, APC-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-24T02:10:31Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-24T02:10:31Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery, 2004, v. 25 n. 6, p. 1054-1058-
dc.identifier.issn1010-7940-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196663-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is an established treatment for recurrent or complicated primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). However, a proportion of patients still complains of chronic pain or discomfort after VATS pleurodesis. We aimed to investigate if paresthesia is a distinct component of the post-operative discomfort in patients receiving VATS for PSP. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted with 52 patients who had received VATS pleurodesis for PSP in our institute during a defined 24 month period. A standardized questionnaire was used to identify paresthetic discomforts which the patients themselves could distinguish from their wound pain. Responses were obtained from 51 patients (42 male, 9 female) with a mean age of 24.1 years (range 14-63 years), giving a response rate of 98.0%. Results: With a median observation time of 19 months (range 2-24 months), 27 patients (52.9%) reported experiencing paresthesia as a post-operative complication distinct from their wound pain. The most commonly described characteristics of the paresthesia were 'pins and needles' (37.0%), 'numbness' (25.9%) or a sensation of abnormal 'swelling' in the chest wall (11.1%). Although only two of the affected patients (7.4%) described the paresthesia as 'severe', consequent functional disturbances in daily life were noted by seven patients (25.9%), and 11 patients (40.7%) actively sought medical or alternative, holistic therapies to relieve the paresthesia. Eight (21.0%) of the 38 patients followed-up for over 12 months after surgery still experienced the paresthesia. Conclusions: Although it should not detract from the proven advantages of VATS, paresthesia in the chest wall represents a distinct but previously overlooked post-VATS complication. It is a potential source of significant post-operative morbidity, and may run a chronic course in some patients. Further study is warranted to elucidate its mechanisms and optimum management. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery-
dc.titleIncidence of chest wall paresthesia after video-assisted thoracic surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejcts.2004.02.018-
dc.identifier.pmid15145009-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2442476603-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1054-
dc.identifier.epage1058-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000221996700031-

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