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Article: Changing family medicine/general practice morbidity patterns in Hong Kong adults

TitleChanging family medicine/general practice morbidity patterns in Hong Kong adults
Authors
Issue Date1997
Citation
Hong Kong Practitioner, 1997, v. 19 n. 10, p. 508-517 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: As Hong Kong becomes more affluent and undergoes rapid urbanization, the family medicine (FM)/general practice (GP) morbidity pattern will shift from acute self limiting illnesses to chronic illnesses similar to other developed countries. Some overseas studies also show that chronic diseases occur at an early age. Objective : To compare the 1994 FM/GP morbidity pattern for adults (aged 12-59) with previous studies done in 1981- 82 and 1985-86, and note the changes and trends. Methods : The overall morbidity pattern by systems in the 1994 Morbidity Survey was compared with the surveys done in 1981-82 and 1985-86. The trend for some highly prevalent illnesses of 1994 survey was compared with the 1981-82 survey. Chi square and Fisher Exact tests were used for analysis. Results : A higher proportion of patients in 1994 presented with problems related to endocrine, circulatory, locomotor and nervous systems and sense organs. Higher proportion of patients in 1994 presented with diabetes mellitus, raised blood pressure, lipid disorders and back pain than in 1981-82. Lower proportion of patients in 1994 presented with peptic ulcer diseases and neurotic disorders. Conclusion : The change can be a real change in prevalence, or a change in readiness of the patients to present themselves, or increased willingness/ability of the physicians to diagnose particular problems. The workload of family physicians (FPs)/general practitioners (GPs) may change from treating predominantly acute self limiting illnesses to managing more chronic diseases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196619
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, A-
dc.contributor.authorWun, YT-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KKC-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-24T02:10:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-24T02:10:28Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Practitioner, 1997, v. 19 n. 10, p. 508-517-
dc.identifier.issn1027-3948-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196619-
dc.description.abstractBackground: As Hong Kong becomes more affluent and undergoes rapid urbanization, the family medicine (FM)/general practice (GP) morbidity pattern will shift from acute self limiting illnesses to chronic illnesses similar to other developed countries. Some overseas studies also show that chronic diseases occur at an early age. Objective : To compare the 1994 FM/GP morbidity pattern for adults (aged 12-59) with previous studies done in 1981- 82 and 1985-86, and note the changes and trends. Methods : The overall morbidity pattern by systems in the 1994 Morbidity Survey was compared with the surveys done in 1981-82 and 1985-86. The trend for some highly prevalent illnesses of 1994 survey was compared with the 1981-82 survey. Chi square and Fisher Exact tests were used for analysis. Results : A higher proportion of patients in 1994 presented with problems related to endocrine, circulatory, locomotor and nervous systems and sense organs. Higher proportion of patients in 1994 presented with diabetes mellitus, raised blood pressure, lipid disorders and back pain than in 1981-82. Lower proportion of patients in 1994 presented with peptic ulcer diseases and neurotic disorders. Conclusion : The change can be a real change in prevalence, or a change in readiness of the patients to present themselves, or increased willingness/ability of the physicians to diagnose particular problems. The workload of family physicians (FPs)/general practitioners (GPs) may change from treating predominantly acute self limiting illnesses to managing more chronic diseases.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Practitioner-
dc.titleChanging family medicine/general practice morbidity patterns in Hong Kong adults-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030819319-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage508-
dc.identifier.epage517-

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