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Article: Ischemic Heart Disease Hospitalization among Older People in a Subtropical City - Hong Kong: Does Winter Have a Greater Impact than Summer?

TitleIschemic Heart Disease Hospitalization among Older People in a Subtropical City - Hong Kong: Does Winter Have a Greater Impact than Summer?
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph
Citation
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2014, v. 11 n. 4, p. 3845-3858 How to Cite?
AbstractGlobally, excess winter morbidity from ischemic heart disease (IHD) is reported. In subtropical regions, there is a need to quantify the difference in the adverse effect of cold winters compared with hot summers, particularly among the older people. Our objectives were to: (i) compare the effect of winter on IHD hospitalizations with that of summer; (ii) examine temporal trends in the excess winter hospitalizations; and (iii) investigate the effect of age, gender, and meteorological factors on predicting such excess. Inpatient admissions due to IHD as principal cause during June 2000 to February 2009 in public hospitals of Hong Kong were extracted for the population aged ≥65. An Excess Hospitalization in Winter vs. Summer (EHWS) Index was used to contrast the adverse effect of weather on hospitalizations in winter vs. summer. Multiple linear regressions were used to investigate the trend and the predictors of such index. It was found that in a subtropical city, greater effect of winter on IHD hospitalizations than summer was observed, particularly among the oldest old (an index of 61.5% (95% CI: 49.5%–74.4%) for men aged ≥85 and 32.3% (95% CI: 25.5%–39.5%) for women aged ≥85). There was significant increasing trend in the index among those aged ≥85 but the age difference was less prominent among the women. Absolute level of coldness was not a significant factor, whereas the change in temperature was a significant factor, which implies that great fluctuation in temperature within a winter day had greater impact on occurrence of circulatory disease than an absolute temperature threshold.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196591
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.035
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.883
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-22T08:39:23Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-22T08:39:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2014, v. 11 n. 4, p. 3845-3858en_US
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196591-
dc.description.abstractGlobally, excess winter morbidity from ischemic heart disease (IHD) is reported. In subtropical regions, there is a need to quantify the difference in the adverse effect of cold winters compared with hot summers, particularly among the older people. Our objectives were to: (i) compare the effect of winter on IHD hospitalizations with that of summer; (ii) examine temporal trends in the excess winter hospitalizations; and (iii) investigate the effect of age, gender, and meteorological factors on predicting such excess. Inpatient admissions due to IHD as principal cause during June 2000 to February 2009 in public hospitals of Hong Kong were extracted for the population aged ≥65. An Excess Hospitalization in Winter vs. Summer (EHWS) Index was used to contrast the adverse effect of weather on hospitalizations in winter vs. summer. Multiple linear regressions were used to investigate the trend and the predictors of such index. It was found that in a subtropical city, greater effect of winter on IHD hospitalizations than summer was observed, particularly among the oldest old (an index of 61.5% (95% CI: 49.5%–74.4%) for men aged ≥85 and 32.3% (95% CI: 25.5%–39.5%) for women aged ≥85). There was significant increasing trend in the index among those aged ≥85 but the age difference was less prominent among the women. Absolute level of coldness was not a significant factor, whereas the change in temperature was a significant factor, which implies that great fluctuation in temperature within a winter day had greater impact on occurrence of circulatory disease than an absolute temperature threshold.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerphen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleIschemic Heart Disease Hospitalization among Older People in a Subtropical City - Hong Kong: Does Winter Have a Greater Impact than Summer?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph110403845en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24714058-
dc.identifier.hkuros228545en_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage3845en_US
dc.identifier.epage3858en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000335762700060-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US

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