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postgraduate thesis: Programming effects on lipid metabolism, oxidative status and inflammation in the heart of offspring born to high : fat diet fed dams with or without green tea supplementation

TitleProgramming effects on lipid metabolism, oxidative status and inflammation in the heart of offspring born to high : fat diet fed dams with or without green tea supplementation
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lam, C. [林駿業]. (2013). Programming effects on lipid metabolism, oxidative status and inflammation in the heart of offspring born to high : fat diet fed dams with or without green tea supplementation. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4985868
AbstractRisks of metabolic syndrome including cardiovascular disease and diabetes are significantly affected by maternal nutrition. This concept of developmental programming had been investigated in our laboratory and in an earlier study, it was established that maternal high-fat diet predisposed rat offspring to insulin resistance and higher triglyceride in serum, liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. These abnormalities, however, were ameliorated by supplementing green tea extract to dam’s diet throughout gestation and lactation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in heart of offspring born to dams receiving high-fat diet with or without green tea supplementation during pregnancy and lactation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an obesogenic diet which was a high-fat diet (HF,30%), low-fat diet (LF,7%) or HF diet containing 0.75% green tea extract prior to conception and throughout gestation. During lactation, half of the dams had their diet switched from HF to GT and vice versa. Pups were weaned to the HF or LF diet, forming 10 offspring groups (gestation/lactation/postweaning): LF/LF/LF, LF/LF/HF, HF/HF/LF, HF/HF/HF, HF/GT/LF, HF/GT/HF, GT/GT/LF, GT/GT/HF, GT/HF/LF and GT/HF/HF. Except a larger fibrotic area, maternal HF diet did not affect lipid accumulation, oxidative status and inflammatory response in the heart of offspring. Analysis of variance revealed different, and even opposite, effects of GT supplementation during gestation and lactation. In offspring born to dams receiving GT supplementation during gestation, they had suppressed fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and higher triglyceride (TG) level in the heart. In contrast, when GT was supplemented to dams during lactation, offspring had elevated heart TG, cholesterol and free fatty acid levels but up-regulated FAO. Since FAO is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, modulation of FAO is believed to affect cellular stress responses in heart. Consistent with FAO, cardiac stress, apoptotic and inflammatory biomarkers including B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), bcl 2 associated-x (bax) and interleukin-1β (IL1b) were down-regulated in offspring born to dams given GT during gestation, whereas GT supplementation during lactation increased the expression of pro-apoptotic markers: bax and caspase-3 (Cas3) concurrent with activation of antioxidant defense system: catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) as adaptive mechanism against increased ROS. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP 2) and subsequent higher bcl 2 /bax ratio has been reported to stimulate apoptosis. In agreement with this, mRNA expression of BNP, bax and Cas3 were found to correlate with that of UCP 2. This suggests UCP 2may play an important role in apoptosis under the impact of maternal GT supplementation. The present data suggest that the effect of maternal high-fat diet is organ specific causing apparently lesser damage to the heart. When GT is given in conjunction with a high-fat diet to dams during gestation, there is no clear cut advantage to the offspring. However, potential adverse effects could not be ruled out when GT is supplemented to dams during lactation possibly due to higher catechin exposure via milk. Future study should focus on establishing the benefits and safety use of GT during gestation.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectInflammation
Lipids - Metabolism
Oxidative stress
Green tea - Therapeutic use
Dept/ProgramBiological Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196089

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Chun-yip-
dc.contributor.author林駿業-
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-28T07:05:53Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-28T07:05:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationLam, C. [林駿業]. (2013). Programming effects on lipid metabolism, oxidative status and inflammation in the heart of offspring born to high : fat diet fed dams with or without green tea supplementation. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4985868-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/196089-
dc.description.abstractRisks of metabolic syndrome including cardiovascular disease and diabetes are significantly affected by maternal nutrition. This concept of developmental programming had been investigated in our laboratory and in an earlier study, it was established that maternal high-fat diet predisposed rat offspring to insulin resistance and higher triglyceride in serum, liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. These abnormalities, however, were ameliorated by supplementing green tea extract to dam’s diet throughout gestation and lactation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in heart of offspring born to dams receiving high-fat diet with or without green tea supplementation during pregnancy and lactation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an obesogenic diet which was a high-fat diet (HF,30%), low-fat diet (LF,7%) or HF diet containing 0.75% green tea extract prior to conception and throughout gestation. During lactation, half of the dams had their diet switched from HF to GT and vice versa. Pups were weaned to the HF or LF diet, forming 10 offspring groups (gestation/lactation/postweaning): LF/LF/LF, LF/LF/HF, HF/HF/LF, HF/HF/HF, HF/GT/LF, HF/GT/HF, GT/GT/LF, GT/GT/HF, GT/HF/LF and GT/HF/HF. Except a larger fibrotic area, maternal HF diet did not affect lipid accumulation, oxidative status and inflammatory response in the heart of offspring. Analysis of variance revealed different, and even opposite, effects of GT supplementation during gestation and lactation. In offspring born to dams receiving GT supplementation during gestation, they had suppressed fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and higher triglyceride (TG) level in the heart. In contrast, when GT was supplemented to dams during lactation, offspring had elevated heart TG, cholesterol and free fatty acid levels but up-regulated FAO. Since FAO is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, modulation of FAO is believed to affect cellular stress responses in heart. Consistent with FAO, cardiac stress, apoptotic and inflammatory biomarkers including B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), bcl 2 associated-x (bax) and interleukin-1β (IL1b) were down-regulated in offspring born to dams given GT during gestation, whereas GT supplementation during lactation increased the expression of pro-apoptotic markers: bax and caspase-3 (Cas3) concurrent with activation of antioxidant defense system: catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) as adaptive mechanism against increased ROS. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP 2) and subsequent higher bcl 2 /bax ratio has been reported to stimulate apoptosis. In agreement with this, mRNA expression of BNP, bax and Cas3 were found to correlate with that of UCP 2. This suggests UCP 2may play an important role in apoptosis under the impact of maternal GT supplementation. The present data suggest that the effect of maternal high-fat diet is organ specific causing apparently lesser damage to the heart. When GT is given in conjunction with a high-fat diet to dams during gestation, there is no clear cut advantage to the offspring. However, potential adverse effects could not be ruled out when GT is supplemented to dams during lactation possibly due to higher catechin exposure via milk. Future study should focus on establishing the benefits and safety use of GT during gestation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshInflammation-
dc.subject.lcshLipids - Metabolism-
dc.subject.lcshOxidative stress-
dc.subject.lcshGreen tea - Therapeutic use-
dc.titleProgramming effects on lipid metabolism, oxidative status and inflammation in the heart of offspring born to high : fat diet fed dams with or without green tea supplementation-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4985868-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineBiological Sciences-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4985868-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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