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Article: Cytomechanical perturbations during low intensity ultrasound pulsing

TitleCytomechanical perturbations during low intensity ultrasound pulsing
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ultrasmedbio
Citation
Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractTo establish the therapeutic potential of low-intensity ultrasound, it is fundamentally important to characterize its biophysical interactions with living cells. Here, through a series of single-cell direct observations, we show that low-intensity ultrasound pulsing would give rise to a dynamic course of cytomechanical perturbations at both the membrane and nucleus levels. Our investigation was conducted using a composite platform that coupled a 1 MHz ultrasound exposure hardware to a confocal microscopy system. Short ultrasound pulses (5 cycles; 2 kHz pulse repetition frequency) with 0.24 W/cm2 spatial-peak, time-averaged intensity (0.85 MPa peak positive acoustic pressure) were delivered over a 10 min period to adherent Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, and live imaging of cellular dynamics was performed before, during, and after the exposure period. Bright-field imaging results showed progressive shrinkage of cellular cross-sectional area (25-45%; N = 7) during low-intensity ultrasound pulsing; the initial rate of size decrease was estimated to be 8-14% per min. This shrinkage was found to be transient, as the sonicated cells had recovered (at a rate of size increase of 0.4-0.9% per min) to their pre-exposure size within 30 min after the end of exposure. 3-D confocal imaging results further revealed that: (i) ultrasound-induced membrane contraction was volumetric in nature (21-45% reduction); (ii) concomitant decrease in nucleus volume was evident (12-25% reduction). Altogether, these findings demonstrate that low-intensity ultrasound pulsing, if applied on the order of minutes, would reversibly perturb the physical and subcellular structures of living cells.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195914
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.298
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.885
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHU, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, JMFen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, ACHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-21T02:19:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-21T02:19:28Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationUltrasound in Medicine & Biology, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-5629en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195914-
dc.description.abstractTo establish the therapeutic potential of low-intensity ultrasound, it is fundamentally important to characterize its biophysical interactions with living cells. Here, through a series of single-cell direct observations, we show that low-intensity ultrasound pulsing would give rise to a dynamic course of cytomechanical perturbations at both the membrane and nucleus levels. Our investigation was conducted using a composite platform that coupled a 1 MHz ultrasound exposure hardware to a confocal microscopy system. Short ultrasound pulses (5 cycles; 2 kHz pulse repetition frequency) with 0.24 W/cm2 spatial-peak, time-averaged intensity (0.85 MPa peak positive acoustic pressure) were delivered over a 10 min period to adherent Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, and live imaging of cellular dynamics was performed before, during, and after the exposure period. Bright-field imaging results showed progressive shrinkage of cellular cross-sectional area (25-45%; N = 7) during low-intensity ultrasound pulsing; the initial rate of size decrease was estimated to be 8-14% per min. This shrinkage was found to be transient, as the sonicated cells had recovered (at a rate of size increase of 0.4-0.9% per min) to their pre-exposure size within 30 min after the end of exposure. 3-D confocal imaging results further revealed that: (i) ultrasound-induced membrane contraction was volumetric in nature (21-45% reduction); (ii) concomitant decrease in nucleus volume was evident (12-25% reduction). Altogether, these findings demonstrate that low-intensity ultrasound pulsing, if applied on the order of minutes, would reversibly perturb the physical and subcellular structures of living cells.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ultrasmedbioen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUltrasound in Medicine & Biologyen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in <Journal title>. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#en_US
dc.titleCytomechanical perturbations during low intensity ultrasound pulsingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWan, JMF: jmfwan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYu, ACH: alfred.yu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWan, JMF=rp00798en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYu, ACH=rp00657en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2014.01.003en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24642219-
dc.identifier.hkuros228303en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000341459000025-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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