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Conference Paper: Coffee consumption increases hepatic expression of cytochrome P450S and significantly reduces liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

TitleCoffee consumption increases hepatic expression of cytochrome P450S and significantly reduces liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jhep
Citation
The International Liver Congress™ 2011 - 46th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2011), Berlin, Germany, 30 March-3 April 2011. In Journal of Hepatology, 2011, v. 54 suppl. 1, p. S346-S347, abstract no. 869 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Coffee consumption has been associated with milder liver disease in the setting of alcoholic liver disease, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Whether coffee consumption is also protective against liver injury and/or fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains unknown. Patients and Methods: Patients with biopsy proven NAFLD (n = 296) for whom life-style questionnaire with coffee consumption history was obtained at time of liver biopsy were evaluated. Coffee consumption was classified as none, minimal-to moderate (<7 servings/week) and daily (≥7 servings/week). In this group, univariant and multivariant analysis were used to assess the relationship between coffee consumption, various histologic parameters (e.g., steatosis, NAS activity score, ballooning, fibrosis), and potentially-relevant demographic variables (e.g., age, gender, BMI). RNA was also isolated from the liver biopsies of 72 of these subjects and subjected to microarray analysis using “Affymetrix genechip HGU133-plus 2.0” to determine if changes in liver gene expression might be attributable to coffee consumption. Results: In univariate analysis, fibrosis stage was inversely related to the amount of coffee consumed (see figure), with higher coffee consumers (≥7 cups weekly) having significantly lower fibrosis stage than those who drank less coffee (p = 0.011). Similar trends were noted for coffee consumption and ballooning (p = 0.089), steatosis (p = 0.094) and NASH activity score (p = 0.059). In multivariate analysis, advanced fibrosis was positively correlated with age (p < 0.04) and negatively correlated with coffee consumption (p < 0.01). Coffee consumption was also associated with lower HbA1c values (r-0.17; p = 0.01), however, the association of coffee consumption and lower fibrosis was independent of HbA1c (p = 0.047). Consumption of other caffeine containing beverages, such as tea and soda, were not associated with fibrosis stage. Unbiased expression array data in patients with NASH who drank one or more cups of coffee/day compared to NASH patients with lower coffee consumption revealed 4 genes of interest differentially expressed, all of which were up-regulated with habitual coffee consumption: UGT2, CYP26A1, CYP3A7, CYP7B1. Conclusion: Habitual coffee consumption appears protective against fibrosis progression in NAFLD. The underlying mechanism might involve induction of certain cytochrome P450 enzymes that are involved in lipid intermediary metabolism.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: The International Liver Congress™ 2011 Abstract Book 46 annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195776
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 10.59
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.570

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTillmann, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorPang, HMHen_US
dc.contributor.authorDellinger, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuy, CDen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoylan, CAen_US
dc.contributor.authorPiercy, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHauser, MAen_US
dc.contributor.authorDiehl, AMEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-10T04:52:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-10T04:52:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe International Liver Congress™ 2011 - 46th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2011), Berlin, Germany, 30 March-3 April 2011. In Journal of Hepatology, 2011, v. 54 suppl. 1, p. S346-S347, abstract no. 869en_US
dc.identifier.issn0168-8278en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195776-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: The International Liver Congress™ 2011 Abstract Book 46 annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Coffee consumption has been associated with milder liver disease in the setting of alcoholic liver disease, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Whether coffee consumption is also protective against liver injury and/or fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains unknown. Patients and Methods: Patients with biopsy proven NAFLD (n = 296) for whom life-style questionnaire with coffee consumption history was obtained at time of liver biopsy were evaluated. Coffee consumption was classified as none, minimal-to moderate (<7 servings/week) and daily (≥7 servings/week). In this group, univariant and multivariant analysis were used to assess the relationship between coffee consumption, various histologic parameters (e.g., steatosis, NAS activity score, ballooning, fibrosis), and potentially-relevant demographic variables (e.g., age, gender, BMI). RNA was also isolated from the liver biopsies of 72 of these subjects and subjected to microarray analysis using “Affymetrix genechip HGU133-plus 2.0” to determine if changes in liver gene expression might be attributable to coffee consumption. Results: In univariate analysis, fibrosis stage was inversely related to the amount of coffee consumed (see figure), with higher coffee consumers (≥7 cups weekly) having significantly lower fibrosis stage than those who drank less coffee (p = 0.011). Similar trends were noted for coffee consumption and ballooning (p = 0.089), steatosis (p = 0.094) and NASH activity score (p = 0.059). In multivariate analysis, advanced fibrosis was positively correlated with age (p < 0.04) and negatively correlated with coffee consumption (p < 0.01). Coffee consumption was also associated with lower HbA1c values (r-0.17; p = 0.01), however, the association of coffee consumption and lower fibrosis was independent of HbA1c (p = 0.047). Consumption of other caffeine containing beverages, such as tea and soda, were not associated with fibrosis stage. Unbiased expression array data in patients with NASH who drank one or more cups of coffee/day compared to NASH patients with lower coffee consumption revealed 4 genes of interest differentially expressed, all of which were up-regulated with habitual coffee consumption: UGT2, CYP26A1, CYP3A7, CYP7B1. Conclusion: Habitual coffee consumption appears protective against fibrosis progression in NAFLD. The underlying mechanism might involve induction of certain cytochrome P450 enzymes that are involved in lipid intermediary metabolism.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jhepen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Hepatologyen_US
dc.titleCoffee consumption increases hepatic expression of cytochrome P450S and significantly reduces liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailPang, HMH: herbpang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPang, HMH=rp01857en_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0168-8278(11)60871-4-
dc.identifier.volume54en_US
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS346, abstract no. 869en_US
dc.identifier.epageS347en_US
dc.publisher.placeThe Netherlandsen_US

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