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Article: Toll-like receptor 10 is involved in induction of innate immune responses to influenza virus infection

TitleToll-like receptor 10 is involved in induction of innate immune responses to influenza virus infection
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014, v. 111 n. 10, p. 3793-3798 How to Cite?
AbstractToll-like receptors (TLRs) play key roles in innate immune recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns of invading microbes. Among the 10 TLR family members identified in humans, TLR10 remains an orphan receptor without known agonist or function. TLR10 is a pseudogene in mice and mouse models are noninformative in this regard. Using influenza virus infection in primary human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages and a human monocytic cell line, we now provide previously unidentified evidence that TLR10 plays a role in innate immune responses following viral infection. Influenza virus infection increased TLR10 expression and TLR10 contributed to innate immune sensing of viral infection leading to cytokine induction, including proinflammatory cytokines and interferons. TLR10 induction is more pronounced following infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus compared with a low pathogenic H1N1 virus. Induction of TLR10 by virus infection requires active virus replication and de novo protein synthesis. Culture supernatants of virus-infected cells modestly up-regulate TLR10 expression in nonvirus-infected cells. Signaling via TLR10 was activated by the functional RNA-protein complex of influenza virus leading to robust induction of cytokine expression. Taken together, our findings identify TLR10 as an important innate immune sensor of viral infection and its role in innate immune defense and immunopathology following viral and bacterial pathogens deserves attention.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195757
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, MYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKok, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorJaume, MDAen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, TFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, JCCen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RGen_US
dc.contributor.authorJin, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-07T04:35:12Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-07T04:35:12Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014, v. 111 n. 10, p. 3793-3798en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195757-
dc.description.abstractToll-like receptors (TLRs) play key roles in innate immune recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns of invading microbes. Among the 10 TLR family members identified in humans, TLR10 remains an orphan receptor without known agonist or function. TLR10 is a pseudogene in mice and mouse models are noninformative in this regard. Using influenza virus infection in primary human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages and a human monocytic cell line, we now provide previously unidentified evidence that TLR10 plays a role in innate immune responses following viral infection. Influenza virus infection increased TLR10 expression and TLR10 contributed to innate immune sensing of viral infection leading to cytokine induction, including proinflammatory cytokines and interferons. TLR10 induction is more pronounced following infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus compared with a low pathogenic H1N1 virus. Induction of TLR10 by virus infection requires active virus replication and de novo protein synthesis. Culture supernatants of virus-infected cells modestly up-regulate TLR10 expression in nonvirus-infected cells. Signaling via TLR10 was activated by the functional RNA-protein complex of influenza virus leading to robust induction of cytokine expression. Taken together, our findings identify TLR10 as an important innate immune sensor of viral infection and its role in innate immune defense and immunopathology following viral and bacterial pathogens deserves attention.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.titleToll-like receptor 10 is involved in induction of innate immune responses to influenza virus infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, MY: suki@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKok, KH: khkok@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJaume, MDA: breizh@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KW: kaiwing@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, TF: yiptf@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, JCC: jimmylcc@connect.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJin, D: dyjin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, MY=rp01536en_US
dc.identifier.authorityKok, KH=rp01455en_US
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_US
dc.identifier.authorityJin, D=rp00452en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1324266111en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24567377-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3956146-
dc.identifier.hkuros228196en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros234372-
dc.identifier.volume111-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage3793-
dc.identifier.epage3798-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000332564800042-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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