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Article: Use of methyl prednisolone and antioxidants in mercuric chloride-induced experimental vasculitis

TitleUse of methyl prednisolone and antioxidants in mercuric chloride-induced experimental vasculitis
Authors
Issue Date1994
Citation
Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 1994, v. 98 n. 1, p. 66-70 How to Cite?
AbstractThe systemic vasculitides are characterized by necrotizing inflammation of blood vessels. Neutrophils are implicated in tissue damage by their presence at the site of injury. They can mediate injury by release of cellular contents including proteinases, cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Antioxidants such as vitamin E and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) may therefore be predicted to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo and could be a cheap and non-toxic form of therapy. We examined this hypothesis in an experimental model of vasculitis which has some similarities to human disease, and in which depletion of neutrophils ameliorates tissue injury. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) treatment induces an autoimmune syndrome and necrotizing leucocytoclastic vasculitis in the Brown Norway (BN) rat; anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) and anti-glomerular basement (GBM) antibodies are present, and vasculitis is reduced by antimicrobials. Methyl prednisolone given intravenously was effective in reducing tissue injury, demonstrating that the model was responsive to a treatment used in man. Vitamin E and NAC were given as daily injections intraperitoneally to BN rats either before, during or after HgCl2 administration. Serial blood samples were taken for anti-MPO and IgE antibodies, which were assayed by ELISA. Necropsies were performed on animals killed at peak disease. At doses of 50-200 mg/kg per day vitamin E had no beneficial effect on tissue injury, regardless of timing of treatment. NAC at 100 or 200 mg/kg also had no significant protective effect on vasculitis. Autoantibody and IgE levels were not affected by either methyl prednisolone or the antioxidants. The lack of benefit of vitamin E and NA suggests that oxidative damage, whether generated by neutrophils or other cells, does not play a major role in the pathogenesis of vasculitis, and that antioxidant therapy is unlikely to be of benefit in systemic vasculitis in man.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195426
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.148
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.369
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQasim, FJ-
dc.contributor.authorMathieson, PW-
dc.contributor.authorThiru, S-
dc.contributor.authorOliveira, DBG-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-28T06:12:08Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-28T06:12:08Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.citationClinical and Experimental Immunology, 1994, v. 98 n. 1, p. 66-70-
dc.identifier.issn0009-9104-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195426-
dc.description.abstractThe systemic vasculitides are characterized by necrotizing inflammation of blood vessels. Neutrophils are implicated in tissue damage by their presence at the site of injury. They can mediate injury by release of cellular contents including proteinases, cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Antioxidants such as vitamin E and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) may therefore be predicted to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo and could be a cheap and non-toxic form of therapy. We examined this hypothesis in an experimental model of vasculitis which has some similarities to human disease, and in which depletion of neutrophils ameliorates tissue injury. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) treatment induces an autoimmune syndrome and necrotizing leucocytoclastic vasculitis in the Brown Norway (BN) rat; anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) and anti-glomerular basement (GBM) antibodies are present, and vasculitis is reduced by antimicrobials. Methyl prednisolone given intravenously was effective in reducing tissue injury, demonstrating that the model was responsive to a treatment used in man. Vitamin E and NAC were given as daily injections intraperitoneally to BN rats either before, during or after HgCl2 administration. Serial blood samples were taken for anti-MPO and IgE antibodies, which were assayed by ELISA. Necropsies were performed on animals killed at peak disease. At doses of 50-200 mg/kg per day vitamin E had no beneficial effect on tissue injury, regardless of timing of treatment. NAC at 100 or 200 mg/kg also had no significant protective effect on vasculitis. Autoantibody and IgE levels were not affected by either methyl prednisolone or the antioxidants. The lack of benefit of vitamin E and NA suggests that oxidative damage, whether generated by neutrophils or other cells, does not play a major role in the pathogenesis of vasculitis, and that antioxidant therapy is unlikely to be of benefit in systemic vasculitis in man.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical and Experimental Immunology-
dc.titleUse of methyl prednisolone and antioxidants in mercuric chloride-induced experimental vasculitis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid7923887-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027987857-
dc.identifier.volume98-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage66-
dc.identifier.epage70-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994PJ84400012-

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