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Article: Deliberate self-harm in older adults: A review of the literature from 1995 to 2004

TitleDeliberate self-harm in older adults: A review of the literature from 1995 to 2004
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2007, v. 22 n. 8, p. 720-732 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The prevention of suicide is a national and international policy priority. Old age is an important predictor of completed suicide. Suicide rates in old age differ markedly from country to country but there is a general trend towards increasing rates with increasing age. In 1996 Draper reviewed critically the evidence on attempted suicide in old age in the 10 years between 1985 and 1994. The review highlighted a need for prospective controlled studies in older people with more representative samples as well as studies examining the interaction of risk factors, precipitants, motivations, psychopathology and response to treatment. The aim of this paper is to update this review and to summarise the advances in our understanding of DSH in later life. Method: We have critically reviewed relevant studies published between 1995 and 2004 to summarise the advances in our understanding of factors associated with deliberate self-harm in later life. Results: The main advances in understanding have been to clarify the effect of personality and cultural factors, service utilisation pre and post attempt, and the (lesser) impact of socio-economic status and physical illness. Methodological weaknesses continue to include inadequate sample sizes performed on highly selected populations, inconsistent age criteria and lack of informant data on studies relating to role of personality. Conclusions: Future studies should include prospective, cross-cultural research with adequate sample sizes and which are population-based. Such approaches might confirm or refute the results generated to date and improve knowledge on factors such as the biological correlates of deliberate self-harm, service utilisation, costs and barriers to health care, and the interaction of these factors. Intervention studies to elucidate the impact of modifying these factors and of specific treatment packages are also needed. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195185
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.699
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, J-
dc.contributor.authorDraper, B-
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, S-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-25T01:40:17Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-25T01:40:17Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2007, v. 22 n. 8, p. 720-732-
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/195185-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The prevention of suicide is a national and international policy priority. Old age is an important predictor of completed suicide. Suicide rates in old age differ markedly from country to country but there is a general trend towards increasing rates with increasing age. In 1996 Draper reviewed critically the evidence on attempted suicide in old age in the 10 years between 1985 and 1994. The review highlighted a need for prospective controlled studies in older people with more representative samples as well as studies examining the interaction of risk factors, precipitants, motivations, psychopathology and response to treatment. The aim of this paper is to update this review and to summarise the advances in our understanding of DSH in later life. Method: We have critically reviewed relevant studies published between 1995 and 2004 to summarise the advances in our understanding of factors associated with deliberate self-harm in later life. Results: The main advances in understanding have been to clarify the effect of personality and cultural factors, service utilisation pre and post attempt, and the (lesser) impact of socio-economic status and physical illness. Methodological weaknesses continue to include inadequate sample sizes performed on highly selected populations, inconsistent age criteria and lack of informant data on studies relating to role of personality. Conclusions: Future studies should include prospective, cross-cultural research with adequate sample sizes and which are population-based. Such approaches might confirm or refute the results generated to date and improve knowledge on factors such as the biological correlates of deliberate self-harm, service utilisation, costs and barriers to health care, and the interaction of these factors. Intervention studies to elucidate the impact of modifying these factors and of specific treatment packages are also needed. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry-
dc.titleDeliberate self-harm in older adults: A review of the literature from 1995 to 2004-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gps.1739-
dc.identifier.pmid17310495-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548251853-
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage720-
dc.identifier.epage732-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248790700002-

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