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Article: Helping cancer patients to quit smoking by understanding their risk perception, behavior, and attitudes related to smoking

TitleHelping cancer patients to quit smoking by understanding their risk perception, behavior, and attitudes related to smoking
Authors
KeywordsCancer
Oncology
Psychological
Risk perception
Smoking
Issue Date2014
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2014, v. 23 n. 8, p, 870-877 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Evidence shows that smoking is a major cause of cancer, and cancer patients who continue smoking are at greater risk for all causes of mortality, cancer recurrence, and second primary cancers. Nevertheless, many cancer patients still smoke and are not willing to quit. This study aimed at understanding the needs and concerns of current and ex-smoking cancer patients, including their risk perceptions, and the behavior and attitudes related to smoking. METHODS: A qualitative research was conducted in an oncology outpatient clinic. A one-to-one semi-structured interview was conducted with current Chinese smokers and ex-smokers after they had been diagnosed with cancer. Data saturation was achieved after interviewing a total of 20 current smokers and 20 ex-smokers. RESULTS: A total of 241 patients who were smokers prior to their diagnosis of cancer were identified. Of 241 patients, 208 (86.31%) quitted and 33 (13.69%) continued smoking after receiving a cancer diagnosis. In general, patients who refused to quit smoking subsequent to a cancer diagnosis thought that the perceived barriers to quitting outweighed the perceived benefits of quitting. In contrast, most cancer patients who quit after their cancer diagnoses thought that the perceived benefits of quitting greatly outweighed the perceived barriers to quitting. CONCLUSIONS: It is vital that healthcare professionals should help cancer patients to quit smoking. Understanding how current smokers and ex-smokers perceive the risks of smoking, and their behavior, attitudes, and experiences related to smoking is an essential prerequisite for the design of an effective smoking cessation intervention. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194834
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, WHCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-17T02:14:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-17T02:14:41Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2014, v. 23 n. 8, p, 870-877en_US
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194834-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Evidence shows that smoking is a major cause of cancer, and cancer patients who continue smoking are at greater risk for all causes of mortality, cancer recurrence, and second primary cancers. Nevertheless, many cancer patients still smoke and are not willing to quit. This study aimed at understanding the needs and concerns of current and ex-smoking cancer patients, including their risk perceptions, and the behavior and attitudes related to smoking. METHODS: A qualitative research was conducted in an oncology outpatient clinic. A one-to-one semi-structured interview was conducted with current Chinese smokers and ex-smokers after they had been diagnosed with cancer. Data saturation was achieved after interviewing a total of 20 current smokers and 20 ex-smokers. RESULTS: A total of 241 patients who were smokers prior to their diagnosis of cancer were identified. Of 241 patients, 208 (86.31%) quitted and 33 (13.69%) continued smoking after receiving a cancer diagnosis. In general, patients who refused to quit smoking subsequent to a cancer diagnosis thought that the perceived barriers to quitting outweighed the perceived benefits of quitting. In contrast, most cancer patients who quit after their cancer diagnoses thought that the perceived benefits of quitting greatly outweighed the perceived barriers to quitting. CONCLUSIONS: It is vital that healthcare professionals should help cancer patients to quit smoking. Understanding how current smokers and ex-smokers perceive the risks of smoking, and their behavior, attitudes, and experiences related to smoking is an essential prerequisite for the design of an effective smoking cessation intervention. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_US
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_US
dc.subjectCancer-
dc.subjectOncology-
dc.subjectPsychological-
dc.subjectRisk perception-
dc.subjectSmoking-
dc.titleHelping cancer patients to quit smoking by understanding their risk perception, behavior, and attitudes related to smokingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, WHC: william3@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: nssophia@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, WHC=rp00528en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.3486en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24493624-
dc.identifier.hkuros227845en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros227844-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000340268000004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.projectProvision of Service of a Youth Quitline Programme for Youth Smokers under the Department of Health-

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