File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Testosterone concentrations in young healthy us versus Chinese men

TitleTestosterone concentrations in young healthy us versus Chinese men
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/
Citation
American Journal of Human Biology, 2014, v. 26 n. 1, p. 99-102 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious small studies examining differences in testosterone concentrations by ethnicity found mixed results for Caucasians and Chinese men, which might be confounded by age differences and living standards. The aim of the present study is to examine the differences in total, free, and bioavailable testosterone concentrations between healthy young men from the United States (US) and from the most economically developed part of China, i.e., Hong Kong (HK). Cross-sectional analysis based on 365 young men from the Third National Health and Nutrition examination Survey (NHANES III) in the US and 299 Chinese men recruited from university students. All participants were aged from 18 to 29 years. Main outcome measures were total testosterone (TT) and calculated bioavailable testosterone (Bio T) and free testosterone (FT). In both US and Chinese men, TT, FT, and Bio T concentration peaked at 20-24 years of age, at 23.19, 0.49, and 12.23 nmol/l in US men, and 20.72, 0.48 and 12.59 nmol/l in Chinese men, respectively. Among those aged 18-24 years, after adjusting for age, US men had higher TT (mean, 95% confidence interval: 21.64, 21.31-21.99 versus 20.20, 20.12-20.28 nmol/l), but not FT (0.47, 0.47-0.48 versus 0.47, 0.47-0.47 nmol/l) or Bio T (11.90, 11.83-11.97 versus 12.39, 12.35-12.42 nmol/l) than Chinese men. TT, but not FT or Bio T concentrations are lower in young healthy Chinese men than US men. These differences apparent in young men may be important in understanding different patterns of diseases between Western and Asian populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194831
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.875
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.018
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, SLRen_US
dc.contributor.authorKavikondala, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-17T02:14:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-17T02:14:41Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Human Biology, 2014, v. 26 n. 1, p. 99-102en_US
dc.identifier.issn1042-0533-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194831-
dc.description.abstractPrevious small studies examining differences in testosterone concentrations by ethnicity found mixed results for Caucasians and Chinese men, which might be confounded by age differences and living standards. The aim of the present study is to examine the differences in total, free, and bioavailable testosterone concentrations between healthy young men from the United States (US) and from the most economically developed part of China, i.e., Hong Kong (HK). Cross-sectional analysis based on 365 young men from the Third National Health and Nutrition examination Survey (NHANES III) in the US and 299 Chinese men recruited from university students. All participants were aged from 18 to 29 years. Main outcome measures were total testosterone (TT) and calculated bioavailable testosterone (Bio T) and free testosterone (FT). In both US and Chinese men, TT, FT, and Bio T concentration peaked at 20-24 years of age, at 23.19, 0.49, and 12.23 nmol/l in US men, and 20.72, 0.48 and 12.59 nmol/l in Chinese men, respectively. Among those aged 18-24 years, after adjusting for age, US men had higher TT (mean, 95% confidence interval: 21.64, 21.31-21.99 versus 20.20, 20.12-20.28 nmol/l), but not FT (0.47, 0.47-0.48 versus 0.47, 0.47-0.47 nmol/l) or Bio T (11.90, 11.83-11.97 versus 12.39, 12.35-12.42 nmol/l) than Chinese men. TT, but not FT or Bio T concentrations are lower in young healthy Chinese men than US men. These differences apparent in young men may be important in understanding different patterns of diseases between Western and Asian populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Human Biologyen_US
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Human Biology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.titleTestosterone concentrations in young healthy us versus Chinese menen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailXu, L: linxu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailAu Yeung, SLR: ayslryan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKavikondala, S: sushma@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajhb.22482-
dc.identifier.pmid24254402-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84887748061-
dc.identifier.hkuros227772en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros230448-
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage99en_US
dc.identifier.epage102en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000328741800014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats