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Article: Wayward daughter: Language contact in the emergence of Pichi (Equatorial Guinea)

TitleWayward daughter: Language contact in the emergence of Pichi (Equatorial Guinea)
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherMouton de Gruyter. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.de/journals/jall
Citation
Journal of African Languages and Linguistics, 2013, v. 34 n. 2, p. 275-299 How to Cite?
AbstractPichi is an Afro-Caribbean English Lexifier Creole spoken by some 150’000 people on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. Pichi is an offshoot of Krio (Sierra Leone) and shares many characteristics with its West African sister languages. However, insulation from English and Krio, extensive contact and hybridization with Spanish, language shift involving the Bantu language Bubi, as well as koineization through the prolonged coexistence of Pichi with closely-related languages like Nigerian Pidgin and Cameroonian Pidgin have given the language a character distinct from that of the other English Lexifier creoles of the region. The study of Pichi and its comparison with other West African AECs therefore offers fresh insights into the role that language contact has played in the differentiation of the Afro-Caribbean English lexifier Creoles.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194809
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.583
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.396
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYakpo, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-17T02:11:37Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-17T02:11:37Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of African Languages and Linguistics, 2013, v. 34 n. 2, p. 275-299en_US
dc.identifier.issn0167-6164-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194809-
dc.description.abstractPichi is an Afro-Caribbean English Lexifier Creole spoken by some 150’000 people on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. Pichi is an offshoot of Krio (Sierra Leone) and shares many characteristics with its West African sister languages. However, insulation from English and Krio, extensive contact and hybridization with Spanish, language shift involving the Bantu language Bubi, as well as koineization through the prolonged coexistence of Pichi with closely-related languages like Nigerian Pidgin and Cameroonian Pidgin have given the language a character distinct from that of the other English Lexifier creoles of the region. The study of Pichi and its comparison with other West African AECs therefore offers fresh insights into the role that language contact has played in the differentiation of the Afro-Caribbean English lexifier Creoles.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMouton de Gruyter. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.de/journals/jallen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of African Languages and Linguisticsen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleWayward daughter: Language contact in the emergence of Pichi (Equatorial Guinea)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYakpo, K: kofi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYakpo, K=rp01715en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/jall-2013-0009en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84889769069-
dc.identifier.hkuros227890en_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage275en_US
dc.identifier.epage299en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000327745500002-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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