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postgraduate thesis: Bioremediation of toxic metals

TitleBioremediation of toxic metals
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Cheung, K. M. [張啟謙]. (2013). Bioremediation of toxic metals. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5099049
AbstractTraditional remediation techniques in removing toxic metal contaminants using physical and chemical methods are expensive and may cause other forms of damage to the environment, comparing with these techniques bioremediation can serve as an inexpensive, effective and environmental friendly remediation method. This thesis mainly discusses different bioremediation techniques and identifies possible areas in Hong Kong for bioremediation and suggests bioremediation methods for each potential area. Bioremediation of toxic metals is the use of microorganisms, plants, or even larger sized organisms to decontaminate sites with toxic metals. Bioremediation includes phytoremediation, microremediation and vermiremediation which use plants, microorganisms and earthworms to remediate contaminated environments respectively. The 4 most common mechanisms in phytoremediation of toxic metals are phytoextraction, phytofiltration, phytovolatilization and phytostabilization. Phytoremediation are used frequently for remediation around the world and its development includes using well-understood technology and genetic engineering to increase its effectiveness. Microremediation is another promising technology in bioremediation of toxic metals and consists of 6 major mechanisms which are biosorption, bioaccumulation, biotransformation, bioleaching, biomineralization and microbially-enhanced chemisorption of metals. Microremediation is mainly in research phase and its development includes identifying new species, combining with phytoremediation and genetic engineering. Vermiremediation is another rapidly developing technique in bioremediation of toxic metals, assisting other bioremediation by burrowing actions of earthworms and its excretion, and accumulating toxic metals inside their bodies. Vermiremediation is also in research phase but it is rapidly developing. Generally, bioremediation is around 60% cheaper than traditional remediation methods and no pollutants are emitted during the process. However the remediation process is slow and generally takes longer than a year. Sources of toxic metals in contaminated areas in Hong Kong are mainly due to historic industrial discharge although present activities also contribute. Potential areas include sites for electronic waste activities, sediments of Kwun Tong typhoon shelter and sediments of Tolo Harbour.
DegreeMaster of Science in Environmental Management
SubjectHeavy metals - Biodegradation
Dept/ProgramEnvironmental Management
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194562

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Kai-him, Matthew-
dc.contributor.author張啟謙-
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-11T23:10:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-02-11T23:10:30Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationCheung, K. M. [張啟謙]. (2013). Bioremediation of toxic metals. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5099049-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194562-
dc.description.abstractTraditional remediation techniques in removing toxic metal contaminants using physical and chemical methods are expensive and may cause other forms of damage to the environment, comparing with these techniques bioremediation can serve as an inexpensive, effective and environmental friendly remediation method. This thesis mainly discusses different bioremediation techniques and identifies possible areas in Hong Kong for bioremediation and suggests bioremediation methods for each potential area. Bioremediation of toxic metals is the use of microorganisms, plants, or even larger sized organisms to decontaminate sites with toxic metals. Bioremediation includes phytoremediation, microremediation and vermiremediation which use plants, microorganisms and earthworms to remediate contaminated environments respectively. The 4 most common mechanisms in phytoremediation of toxic metals are phytoextraction, phytofiltration, phytovolatilization and phytostabilization. Phytoremediation are used frequently for remediation around the world and its development includes using well-understood technology and genetic engineering to increase its effectiveness. Microremediation is another promising technology in bioremediation of toxic metals and consists of 6 major mechanisms which are biosorption, bioaccumulation, biotransformation, bioleaching, biomineralization and microbially-enhanced chemisorption of metals. Microremediation is mainly in research phase and its development includes identifying new species, combining with phytoremediation and genetic engineering. Vermiremediation is another rapidly developing technique in bioremediation of toxic metals, assisting other bioremediation by burrowing actions of earthworms and its excretion, and accumulating toxic metals inside their bodies. Vermiremediation is also in research phase but it is rapidly developing. Generally, bioremediation is around 60% cheaper than traditional remediation methods and no pollutants are emitted during the process. However the remediation process is slow and generally takes longer than a year. Sources of toxic metals in contaminated areas in Hong Kong are mainly due to historic industrial discharge although present activities also contribute. Potential areas include sites for electronic waste activities, sediments of Kwun Tong typhoon shelter and sediments of Tolo Harbour.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshHeavy metals - Biodegradation-
dc.titleBioremediation of toxic metals-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5099049-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Science in Environmental Management-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEnvironmental Management-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5099049-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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