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Article: Geomorphologic features related to gravitational collapse: Submarine landsliding to lateral spreading on a Late Miocene-Quaternary slope (SE Crete, eastern Mediterranean)

TitleGeomorphologic features related to gravitational collapse: Submarine landsliding to lateral spreading on a Late Miocene-Quaternary slope (SE Crete, eastern Mediterranean)
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Geomorphology, 2010, v. 123 n. 1-2, p. 13-33 How to Cite?
AbstractDetailed geological mapping, complemented by sedimentary facies analysis, photomosaics and topographic measurements (height, width) allowed the investigation of the geomorphological features related to the Late Miocene-Quaternary gravitational collapse of a palaeoslope located in SE Crete (eastern Mediterranean). In the study area, carbonate megablocks indicative of submarine landsliding during the Late Miocene alternate with collapse features more typical of subaerial settings; the latter generated after a major event of tectonic uplift initiated in Crete during the Early-mid Pliocene. Submarine features typically show basal shear zones, rather than planes, generated in near-seafloor strata deformed in ductile form during the gravitational collapse of the megablocks. The lithology of failed carbonate strata differs from that of their basal shear surfaces, a characteristic providing a reliable estimate for the degree and styles of basal deformation during submarine slope instability. Styles of submarine collapse include, by order of magnitude; (i) lateral spreading of fractured segments of fan cones and carbonate sheet flows, eventually transported 100s of metres downslope; (ii) aperture of ravines and chasms in gravitationally unstable fan cones and boulder conglomerates; (iii) gliding of megablocks over a ductile basal layer through a distance of up to several kilometres; and (iv) rolling of subcircular blocks, often within a debris-flow matrix in fan cones and deltas, or embedded in slope siliciclastic strata. This work highlights the existence of prominent 2-10. m basal shear zones in strata underneath the larger megablocks deposited on marine slope strata. Basal shear zones comprise a melange of reworked conglomerates and breccia clasts from overlying megablocks, large ripped blocks of rock and faulted near-seafloor strata, at places showing remnant beds and sand injection features. Consequently, the outcrop data show an average 5:1 ratio between the maximum observed thickness of megablocks and the thickness of basal shear zones (R), a value of similar magnitude to published examples from offshore landslides. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194286
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.813
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.441
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAlves, TM-
dc.contributor.authorLourenço, SDN-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:24Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationGeomorphology, 2010, v. 123 n. 1-2, p. 13-33-
dc.identifier.issn0169-555X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194286-
dc.description.abstractDetailed geological mapping, complemented by sedimentary facies analysis, photomosaics and topographic measurements (height, width) allowed the investigation of the geomorphological features related to the Late Miocene-Quaternary gravitational collapse of a palaeoslope located in SE Crete (eastern Mediterranean). In the study area, carbonate megablocks indicative of submarine landsliding during the Late Miocene alternate with collapse features more typical of subaerial settings; the latter generated after a major event of tectonic uplift initiated in Crete during the Early-mid Pliocene. Submarine features typically show basal shear zones, rather than planes, generated in near-seafloor strata deformed in ductile form during the gravitational collapse of the megablocks. The lithology of failed carbonate strata differs from that of their basal shear surfaces, a characteristic providing a reliable estimate for the degree and styles of basal deformation during submarine slope instability. Styles of submarine collapse include, by order of magnitude; (i) lateral spreading of fractured segments of fan cones and carbonate sheet flows, eventually transported 100s of metres downslope; (ii) aperture of ravines and chasms in gravitationally unstable fan cones and boulder conglomerates; (iii) gliding of megablocks over a ductile basal layer through a distance of up to several kilometres; and (iv) rolling of subcircular blocks, often within a debris-flow matrix in fan cones and deltas, or embedded in slope siliciclastic strata. This work highlights the existence of prominent 2-10. m basal shear zones in strata underneath the larger megablocks deposited on marine slope strata. Basal shear zones comprise a melange of reworked conglomerates and breccia clasts from overlying megablocks, large ripped blocks of rock and faulted near-seafloor strata, at places showing remnant beds and sand injection features. Consequently, the outcrop data show an average 5:1 ratio between the maximum observed thickness of megablocks and the thickness of basal shear zones (R), a value of similar magnitude to published examples from offshore landslides. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofGeomorphology-
dc.titleGeomorphologic features related to gravitational collapse: Submarine landsliding to lateral spreading on a Late Miocene-Quaternary slope (SE Crete, eastern Mediterranean)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.geomorph.2010.04.030-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77956338935-
dc.identifier.volume123-
dc.identifier.issue1-2-
dc.identifier.spage13-
dc.identifier.epage33-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282732600002-

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