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Article: Feeling sad and useless: An investigation into personal acceptance of disability and its association with depression following stroke

TitleFeeling sad and useless: An investigation into personal acceptance of disability and its association with depression following stroke
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Clinical Rehabilitation, 2010, v. 24 n. 6, p. 555-564 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To study the association of acceptance of disability with depression following stroke and its ability to predict depression at follow-up. Design: A prospective cohort mixed (quantitative and qualitative) design was used. Setting and subjects: Patients admitted to a stroke unit were consecutively recruited. Eighty-nine participated at one month and 81 were followed up nine months post stroke. Main measures: Depressive disorder was assessed using a structured clinical interview. Disability and acceptance of disability were measured using self-report scales. At one month post stroke, 60 consecutive participants also participated in open-ended interviews exploring their individual concerns about having had a stroke and their responses were analysed qualitatively. Results: One-third of participants were found to have depression (29/89; 33% at one month and 24/81; 30% at nine months). Non-acceptance of disability remained associated with depression after controlling for age, gender, original stroke severity and current disability at one month (odds ratio (OR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.47) and nine months (OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.22-1.75). Also, non-acceptance of disability measured at one month independently predicted depression measured at nine months (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.05-1.35). The qualitative findings illustrated a self-reproachful element to non-acceptance of disability. Patients with depression often said that they should still be capable and sometimes referred to themselves as useless; whereas patients who were not depressed commonly reported having accepted stroke-related disability. Conclusions: These finding suggest that personal beliefs about accepting disability are associated with and predict emotional adaptation following stroke. © The Author(s), 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194275
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.403
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.149
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTownend, E-
dc.contributor.authorTinson, D-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, J-
dc.contributor.authorSharpe, M-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:23Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:23Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Rehabilitation, 2010, v. 24 n. 6, p. 555-564-
dc.identifier.issn0269-2155-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194275-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To study the association of acceptance of disability with depression following stroke and its ability to predict depression at follow-up. Design: A prospective cohort mixed (quantitative and qualitative) design was used. Setting and subjects: Patients admitted to a stroke unit were consecutively recruited. Eighty-nine participated at one month and 81 were followed up nine months post stroke. Main measures: Depressive disorder was assessed using a structured clinical interview. Disability and acceptance of disability were measured using self-report scales. At one month post stroke, 60 consecutive participants also participated in open-ended interviews exploring their individual concerns about having had a stroke and their responses were analysed qualitatively. Results: One-third of participants were found to have depression (29/89; 33% at one month and 24/81; 30% at nine months). Non-acceptance of disability remained associated with depression after controlling for age, gender, original stroke severity and current disability at one month (odds ratio (OR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.47) and nine months (OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.22-1.75). Also, non-acceptance of disability measured at one month independently predicted depression measured at nine months (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.05-1.35). The qualitative findings illustrated a self-reproachful element to non-acceptance of disability. Patients with depression often said that they should still be capable and sometimes referred to themselves as useless; whereas patients who were not depressed commonly reported having accepted stroke-related disability. Conclusions: These finding suggest that personal beliefs about accepting disability are associated with and predict emotional adaptation following stroke. © The Author(s), 2010.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Rehabilitation-
dc.titleFeeling sad and useless: An investigation into personal acceptance of disability and its association with depression following stroke-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0269215509358934-
dc.identifier.pmid20483889-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77952963033-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage555-
dc.identifier.epage564-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278117300008-

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