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Article: Early neurological deterioration in acute stroke: Clinical characteristics and impact on outcome

TitleEarly neurological deterioration in acute stroke: Clinical characteristics and impact on outcome
Authors
Issue Date2006
Citation
QJM, 2006, v. 99 n. 9, p. 625-633 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: A significant proportion of acute stroke patients suffer neurological deterioration during the first few days of recovery. Aim: To explore the frequency, clinical characteristics, and consequences of early neurological deterioration during the acute recovery period. Methods: We assessed all consecutive patients admitted to a University hospital with suspected stroke. We recorded the following on admission: baseline characteristics, physiological parameters and laboratory results. On day 5 we recorded occurrence of complications, and functional outcome. Early neurological deterioration was defined as an increase in National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) by two or more points (or stroke-related death) between admission and day 5. Results: We recruited 188 stroke patients, of whom 36 (19%) suffered early neurological deterioration. Patients with early neurological deterioration were significantly more likely to: (i) arrive at the hospital earlier (median 2.25 vs. 7.2 h, p = 0.015); (ii) have a history of atrial fibrillation (33% vs. 16%, p = 0.039); (iii) be current non-smokers (24% vs. 11%, p = 0.041); (iv) have a severe stroke - more total anterior circulation strokes (67% vs. 26%, p < 0.001) and worse NIHSS and GCS scores; (v) have intracerebral haemorrhage (22% vs. 7%, p = 0.011); (vi) have higher serum urea (mean 7.8 vs. 6.5 mmol/l, p = 0.035) and leukocyte count (mean 12.6 vs. 9.7 × 10 9/l, p = 0.044); and (vi) die in hospital (44% vs. 10%, OR 12.8, 95%CI 3.8-43.1, p < 0.001). Discussion: Early neurological deterioration is a frequent and important complication in acute stroke, with a poor short-term prognosis. Effective treatment strategies are urgently needed to reduce its occurrence and impact on recovery. © 2006 Oxford University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194168
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.824
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.633
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwan, J-
dc.contributor.authorHand, P-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:15Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:15Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationQJM, 2006, v. 99 n. 9, p. 625-633-
dc.identifier.issn1460-2725-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194168-
dc.description.abstractBackground: A significant proportion of acute stroke patients suffer neurological deterioration during the first few days of recovery. Aim: To explore the frequency, clinical characteristics, and consequences of early neurological deterioration during the acute recovery period. Methods: We assessed all consecutive patients admitted to a University hospital with suspected stroke. We recorded the following on admission: baseline characteristics, physiological parameters and laboratory results. On day 5 we recorded occurrence of complications, and functional outcome. Early neurological deterioration was defined as an increase in National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) by two or more points (or stroke-related death) between admission and day 5. Results: We recruited 188 stroke patients, of whom 36 (19%) suffered early neurological deterioration. Patients with early neurological deterioration were significantly more likely to: (i) arrive at the hospital earlier (median 2.25 vs. 7.2 h, p = 0.015); (ii) have a history of atrial fibrillation (33% vs. 16%, p = 0.039); (iii) be current non-smokers (24% vs. 11%, p = 0.041); (iv) have a severe stroke - more total anterior circulation strokes (67% vs. 26%, p < 0.001) and worse NIHSS and GCS scores; (v) have intracerebral haemorrhage (22% vs. 7%, p = 0.011); (vi) have higher serum urea (mean 7.8 vs. 6.5 mmol/l, p = 0.035) and leukocyte count (mean 12.6 vs. 9.7 × 10 9/l, p = 0.044); and (vi) die in hospital (44% vs. 10%, OR 12.8, 95%CI 3.8-43.1, p < 0.001). Discussion: Early neurological deterioration is a frequent and important complication in acute stroke, with a poor short-term prognosis. Effective treatment strategies are urgently needed to reduce its occurrence and impact on recovery. © 2006 Oxford University Press.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofQJM-
dc.titleEarly neurological deterioration in acute stroke: Clinical characteristics and impact on outcome-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/qjmed/hcl082-
dc.identifier.pmid16905751-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33749584360-
dc.identifier.volume99-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage625-
dc.identifier.epage633-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240428000006-

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