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Article: Fetal cerebral Doppler studies as a predictor of perinatal outcome and subsequent neurologic handicap

TitleFetal cerebral Doppler studies as a predictor of perinatal outcome and subsequent neurologic handicap
Authors
Issue Date1996
Citation
Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1996, v. 87 n. 6, p. 981-988 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To study the use of middle cerebral arterial Doppler findings in a group of high-risk fetuses as a predictor of adverse perinatal outcome, including subsequent neurologic handicap. Methods: A group of very high-risk fetuses was recruited over a 2-year period for study. Weekly fetal biometries and Doppler studies of the umbilical artery and middle cerebral arteries were carried out until delivery. Main outcome indices analyzed included birth weight ratio (ratio of observed birth weight to mean birth weight for gestation), days of ventilator requirement, neonatal intracranial hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, and follow-up data on major neurologic handicap and death. Results: Seventy-four patients were recruited. One hundred thirty-four sets of examinations were made and prospective follow-up data were available for up to 2 years. The ratio of the umbilical and middle cerebral arterial resistance index was found to be inversely proportional to the birth weight ratio. Fetuses who had a high prenatal umbilical cerebral Doppler ratio had significantly lower birth weight ratios than those with normal findings (0.72 versus 0.92; P < .001). The ratio was a more sensitive marker for growth restriction (sensitivity 78%) than conventional fetal biometry and umbilical arterial systolic- diastolic ratio. However, fetuses with high ratios did not have higher incidences of perinatal complications or subsequent neurologic handicap. Conclusion: Prenatal cerebral vasodilation is a sensitive marker for growth restriction and it seems to be a physiologic response to hypoxia. Fetuses with intrauterine cerebral vasodilation do not have increased risk for subsequent gross neurologic damage.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194110
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.656
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.899
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, FY-
dc.contributor.authorPun, TC-
dc.contributor.authorLam, P-
dc.contributor.authorLam, C-
dc.contributor.authorLee, CP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, YH-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:11Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:11Z-
dc.date.issued1996-
dc.identifier.citationObstetrics and Gynecology, 1996, v. 87 n. 6, p. 981-988-
dc.identifier.issn0029-7844-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194110-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To study the use of middle cerebral arterial Doppler findings in a group of high-risk fetuses as a predictor of adverse perinatal outcome, including subsequent neurologic handicap. Methods: A group of very high-risk fetuses was recruited over a 2-year period for study. Weekly fetal biometries and Doppler studies of the umbilical artery and middle cerebral arteries were carried out until delivery. Main outcome indices analyzed included birth weight ratio (ratio of observed birth weight to mean birth weight for gestation), days of ventilator requirement, neonatal intracranial hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, and follow-up data on major neurologic handicap and death. Results: Seventy-four patients were recruited. One hundred thirty-four sets of examinations were made and prospective follow-up data were available for up to 2 years. The ratio of the umbilical and middle cerebral arterial resistance index was found to be inversely proportional to the birth weight ratio. Fetuses who had a high prenatal umbilical cerebral Doppler ratio had significantly lower birth weight ratios than those with normal findings (0.72 versus 0.92; P < .001). The ratio was a more sensitive marker for growth restriction (sensitivity 78%) than conventional fetal biometry and umbilical arterial systolic- diastolic ratio. However, fetuses with high ratios did not have higher incidences of perinatal complications or subsequent neurologic handicap. Conclusion: Prenatal cerebral vasodilation is a sensitive marker for growth restriction and it seems to be a physiologic response to hypoxia. Fetuses with intrauterine cerebral vasodilation do not have increased risk for subsequent gross neurologic damage.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofObstetrics and Gynecology-
dc.titleFetal cerebral Doppler studies as a predictor of perinatal outcome and subsequent neurologic handicap-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0029-7844(96)00062-2-
dc.identifier.pmid8649710-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029992831-
dc.identifier.volume87-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage981-
dc.identifier.epage988-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996UM75500016-

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