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Article: Perinatal risk factors for suicide in young adults in Taiwan

TitlePerinatal risk factors for suicide in young adults in Taiwan
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
International Journal of Epidemiology, 2013, v. 42 n. 5, p. 1381-1389 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: We investigated the association of early life social factors-maternal age, single motherhood, socioeconomic position, birth order and family size-with future risk of suicide in Taiwan. METHODS: Using a nested case-control design, we used linked data from Taiwan's Birth Registry (1978-93) and Taiwan's Death Registry (1993-2008) and identified 3984 suicides aged 15-30 years. For each suicide, 30 controls matched by age and sex were randomly selected, using incidence density sampling. Conditional logistic regression models were estimated to assess the association of early life risk factors with suicide. RESULTS: Younger maternal age (<25 years), single motherhood, lower paternal educational level and higher birth order were independently associated with increased risk of suicide. Stratified analyses suggest that lower paternal educational level was associated with male, but not female suicide risk (Pinteraction=0.02). Single motherhood was a stronger risk factor for suicide in female than in male offspring [odds ratios (95% confidence interval)=2.30 (1.47, 3.58) vs. 1.50 (1.01, 2.20), Pinteraction=0.12]. There was a suggestion that in families with large sibship size (>/=4 siblings), the excess in suicide risk was greater among later born daughters compared with later born sons (Pinteraction=0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for the results of European studies, suggesting that early life social circumstances influence future risk of suicide. Factors specific to Taiwanese culture, such as a preference for male offspring, may have influenced gender-specific patterns of risk.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193935
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.522
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.381
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, YYen_US
dc.contributor.authorGunnell, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T06:35:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-28T06:35:41Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Epidemiology, 2013, v. 42 n. 5, p. 1381-1389en_US
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193935-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We investigated the association of early life social factors-maternal age, single motherhood, socioeconomic position, birth order and family size-with future risk of suicide in Taiwan. METHODS: Using a nested case-control design, we used linked data from Taiwan's Birth Registry (1978-93) and Taiwan's Death Registry (1993-2008) and identified 3984 suicides aged 15-30 years. For each suicide, 30 controls matched by age and sex were randomly selected, using incidence density sampling. Conditional logistic regression models were estimated to assess the association of early life risk factors with suicide. RESULTS: Younger maternal age (<25 years), single motherhood, lower paternal educational level and higher birth order were independently associated with increased risk of suicide. Stratified analyses suggest that lower paternal educational level was associated with male, but not female suicide risk (Pinteraction=0.02). Single motherhood was a stronger risk factor for suicide in female than in male offspring [odds ratios (95% confidence interval)=2.30 (1.47, 3.58) vs. 1.50 (1.01, 2.20), Pinteraction=0.12]. There was a suggestion that in families with large sibship size (>/=4 siblings), the excess in suicide risk was greater among later born daughters compared with later born sons (Pinteraction=0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for the results of European studies, suggesting that early life social circumstances influence future risk of suicide. Factors specific to Taiwanese culture, such as a preference for male offspring, may have influenced gender-specific patterns of risk.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titlePerinatal risk factors for suicide in young adults in Taiwanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChang, S: sschang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChang, S=rp01582en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ije/dyt129en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23920142-
dc.identifier.hkuros227525en_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage1381en_US
dc.identifier.epage1389en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000326726000027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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