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Article: Management of Chemoresistant and Quiescent Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

TitleManagement of Chemoresistant and Quiescent Gestational Trophoblastic Disease
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer Healthcare.
Citation
Current Obstetrics and Gynecology Reports, 2014, v. 3 n. 1, p. 84-90 How to Cite?
AbstractGestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is highly chemosensitive and has a high cure rate. Since the introduction of chemotherapy, reliable measurement of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels, and individualised risk-based therapy into the management of GTN, almost all low-risk and more than 80 % of high-risk GTN cases are curable. However, approximately 25 % of high-risk GTN developed resistance to chemotherapy or relapsed after completion of initial therapy, which often necessitate salvage combination chemotherapy. On the other end of the spectrum, a proportion of patients with gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) have persistently low levels of hCG, without clinical or radiological evidence of disease, a condition called quiescent GTD. Recently, measurement of hyperglycosylated hCG has been proposed for the management of patients with quiescent GTD. Although representing a small proportion of GTD cases, the management of patients with chemoresistant and quiescent GTD often poses challenges to medical practitioners.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193928
ISSN
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNgu, SFen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KKLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T06:34:31Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-28T06:34:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Obstetrics and Gynecology Reports, 2014, v. 3 n. 1, p. 84-90en_US
dc.identifier.issn2161-3303-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193928-
dc.description.abstractGestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is highly chemosensitive and has a high cure rate. Since the introduction of chemotherapy, reliable measurement of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels, and individualised risk-based therapy into the management of GTN, almost all low-risk and more than 80 % of high-risk GTN cases are curable. However, approximately 25 % of high-risk GTN developed resistance to chemotherapy or relapsed after completion of initial therapy, which often necessitate salvage combination chemotherapy. On the other end of the spectrum, a proportion of patients with gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) have persistently low levels of hCG, without clinical or radiological evidence of disease, a condition called quiescent GTD. Recently, measurement of hyperglycosylated hCG has been proposed for the management of patients with quiescent GTD. Although representing a small proportion of GTD cases, the management of patients with chemoresistant and quiescent GTD often poses challenges to medical practitioners.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Healthcare.-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Obstetrics and Gynecology Reportsen_US
dc.titleManagement of Chemoresistant and Quiescent Gestational Trophoblastic Diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNgu, SF: ngusiewf@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KKL: kklchan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNgu, SF=rp01367en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KKL=rp00499en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13669-013-0071-6-
dc.identifier.pmid24533232-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3920061-
dc.identifier.hkuros227449en_US
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage84-
dc.identifier.epage90-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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