File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Suicide rates among working-age adults in South Korea before and after the 2008 economic crisis

TitleSuicide rates among working-age adults in South Korea before and after the 2008 economic crisis
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2014, v. 68 n. 3, p. 246-252 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Multiple studies have shown that macroeconomic factors are associated with changes in suicide rates. We investigated how changes in economic conditions associated with the recent economic crisis in South Korea influenced suicide rates among working-age adults. Methods: Time-series analyses were performed to examine the temporal associations of national unemployment rates and sex-employment-specific suicide rates in South Korea from 2003 to 2011, with particular attention to the increases of suicides that occurred during the recessionary period that began in 2008. We also compared the relative risk of suicide among different occupations. Results: National unemployment rates were positively associated with suicide rates among employed and unemployed men and women, with a 2-month to 3 month lagged period. Significant increases of suicide rates among working-age adults during the recession were detected in most of the subgroups stratified by age, sex and employment status. Forty-three per cent of the increase of suicides was derived from the employed population. Compared with workers in elementary occupations, the relative risk of suicide for mangers increased by threefold during the recessionary period. Among those who were employed, half of the increases in suicides occurred among clerks and workers involved in sales and services. Conclusions: Changes in macroeconomic conditions are tied to population-level suicide risks for employed and unemployed persons. However, these associations vary depending on sex, employment status and occupational roles. In advance of future economic crises, it is important to develop prevention initiatives intended to reach the diverse populations potentially exposed to the adverse effects of sudden economic disruptions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193914
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.342
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, CH-
dc.contributor.authorCaine, ED-
dc.contributor.authorYou, S-
dc.contributor.authorFu, KW-
dc.contributor.authorChang, S-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T06:32:35Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-28T06:32:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2014, v. 68 n. 3, p. 246-252-
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193914-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Multiple studies have shown that macroeconomic factors are associated with changes in suicide rates. We investigated how changes in economic conditions associated with the recent economic crisis in South Korea influenced suicide rates among working-age adults. Methods: Time-series analyses were performed to examine the temporal associations of national unemployment rates and sex-employment-specific suicide rates in South Korea from 2003 to 2011, with particular attention to the increases of suicides that occurred during the recessionary period that began in 2008. We also compared the relative risk of suicide among different occupations. Results: National unemployment rates were positively associated with suicide rates among employed and unemployed men and women, with a 2-month to 3 month lagged period. Significant increases of suicide rates among working-age adults during the recession were detected in most of the subgroups stratified by age, sex and employment status. Forty-three per cent of the increase of suicides was derived from the employed population. Compared with workers in elementary occupations, the relative risk of suicide for mangers increased by threefold during the recessionary period. Among those who were employed, half of the increases in suicides occurred among clerks and workers involved in sales and services. Conclusions: Changes in macroeconomic conditions are tied to population-level suicide risks for employed and unemployed persons. However, these associations vary depending on sex, employment status and occupational roles. In advance of future economic crises, it is important to develop prevention initiatives intended to reach the diverse populations potentially exposed to the adverse effects of sudden economic disruptions.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health-
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.-
dc.titleSuicide rates among working-age adults in South Korea before and after the 2008 economic crisis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CH: gchc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFu, KW: kwfu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, S: sschang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CH=rp02477-
dc.identifier.authorityFu, KW=rp00552-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, S=rp01582-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech-2013-202759-
dc.identifier.pmid24248999-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84894070377-
dc.identifier.hkuros227601-
dc.identifier.volume68-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage246-
dc.identifier.epage252-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000330536300009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats