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postgraduate thesis: Associations of economic indicators and different cause-specific mortalities in the world

TitleAssociations of economic indicators and different cause-specific mortalities in the world
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Ma, K. [马可]. (2013). Associations of economic indicators and different cause-specific mortalities in the world. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5098786
AbstractObjective The objective of the present study is to explore the associations of health expenditures and cause-specific mortality among countries at different stages of economic development. Methodology Scatter plot and simple linear regression were used to estimate whether there was an association between health expenditures and cause-specific mortality. The statistical significance levels were set at p < 0.05. Mortalities due to all causes, and three specific causes of the global burden of disease (GBD) were used. The three kinds of cause-specific mortalities were: communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions (CMPN), non-communicable disease and injuries. Countries were grouped into four income groups according to the standard issued by World Bank in 2012. Result This study suggested general government expenditure on health, as a percentage of total government expenditure, was inversely associated with the three cause-specific mortalities, especially in high income group. Conclusion: This study showed an inverse association between healthcare expenditure and cause-specific mortalities. The Law of Health Transition has been once again evidenced. In developed countries, non-communicable diseases contributed to more deaths compared with mortality from communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions (CMPN). While in less-developed countries, they were facing higher mortalities; CMPN was still a major cause of death, especially among children.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectMortality - Economic aspects
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193802

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMa, Ke-
dc.contributor.author马可-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-27T23:10:47Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-27T23:10:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationMa, K. [马可]. (2013). Associations of economic indicators and different cause-specific mortalities in the world. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5098786-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193802-
dc.description.abstractObjective The objective of the present study is to explore the associations of health expenditures and cause-specific mortality among countries at different stages of economic development. Methodology Scatter plot and simple linear regression were used to estimate whether there was an association between health expenditures and cause-specific mortality. The statistical significance levels were set at p < 0.05. Mortalities due to all causes, and three specific causes of the global burden of disease (GBD) were used. The three kinds of cause-specific mortalities were: communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions (CMPN), non-communicable disease and injuries. Countries were grouped into four income groups according to the standard issued by World Bank in 2012. Result This study suggested general government expenditure on health, as a percentage of total government expenditure, was inversely associated with the three cause-specific mortalities, especially in high income group. Conclusion: This study showed an inverse association between healthcare expenditure and cause-specific mortalities. The Law of Health Transition has been once again evidenced. In developed countries, non-communicable diseases contributed to more deaths compared with mortality from communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions (CMPN). While in less-developed countries, they were facing higher mortalities; CMPN was still a major cause of death, especially among children.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshMortality - Economic aspects-
dc.titleAssociations of economic indicators and different cause-specific mortalities in the world-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5098786-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5098786-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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