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postgraduate thesis: Factors affecting influenza vaccination among pregnant women : a systematic review

TitleFactors affecting influenza vaccination among pregnant women : a systematic review
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Fong, C. [方賽貞]. (2013). Factors affecting influenza vaccination among pregnant women : a systematic review. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5098470
AbstractObjective: Pregnancy has been recognized as a risk factor for severe pandemic influenza illness and this “vulnerable” group is suggested to be heightened alertness to the disease by WHO. This systemic review aims to identify the factors affecting the uptake of influenza vaccination among pregnant women as the immunization uptake among this particular group of population is low or suboptimal worldwide. Methods: Systematic literature reviews were conducted by using MEDLINE and PubMed with the key words: “influenza vaccination uptake” and “pregnant women” in the period of January 2004 to January 2013. It was further supplemented by a manual search for literatures and articles on the WHO website, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website, Google Scholar, and reference lists of reviews captured by initial searches. Results: Of the 222 articles identified, 10 studies were found to be relevant in this system literature review. Influenza vaccine coverage among pregnant women was highly diverse (6.2-76%) among the 10 studies. Overall, pregnant women were more likely to take the vaccination against influenza if they: (1) believed the benefits of the vaccine outweighed the potential barriers, (2) believed the influenza was severe and they were highly susceptible to the disease, and (3) were influenced by the positive cues to action such as recommendation from health care professionals and the experience of the influenza vaccination uptake. Conclusion: Overall, greater emphasis on vaccine effectiveness and safety, and the recommendation from health care providers is needed to increase the number of pregnant women influenza immunization in the future public health campaigns.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectInfluenza - Vaccination
Pregnant women - Health and hygiene
Dept/ProgramMedicine
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193774

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFong, Choi-ching-
dc.contributor.author方賽貞-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-27T23:10:43Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-27T23:10:43Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationFong, C. [方賽貞]. (2013). Factors affecting influenza vaccination among pregnant women : a systematic review. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5098470-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193774-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Pregnancy has been recognized as a risk factor for severe pandemic influenza illness and this “vulnerable” group is suggested to be heightened alertness to the disease by WHO. This systemic review aims to identify the factors affecting the uptake of influenza vaccination among pregnant women as the immunization uptake among this particular group of population is low or suboptimal worldwide. Methods: Systematic literature reviews were conducted by using MEDLINE and PubMed with the key words: “influenza vaccination uptake” and “pregnant women” in the period of January 2004 to January 2013. It was further supplemented by a manual search for literatures and articles on the WHO website, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website, Google Scholar, and reference lists of reviews captured by initial searches. Results: Of the 222 articles identified, 10 studies were found to be relevant in this system literature review. Influenza vaccine coverage among pregnant women was highly diverse (6.2-76%) among the 10 studies. Overall, pregnant women were more likely to take the vaccination against influenza if they: (1) believed the benefits of the vaccine outweighed the potential barriers, (2) believed the influenza was severe and they were highly susceptible to the disease, and (3) were influenced by the positive cues to action such as recommendation from health care professionals and the experience of the influenza vaccination uptake. Conclusion: Overall, greater emphasis on vaccine effectiveness and safety, and the recommendation from health care providers is needed to increase the number of pregnant women influenza immunization in the future public health campaigns.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshInfluenza - Vaccination-
dc.subject.lcshPregnant women - Health and hygiene-
dc.titleFactors affecting influenza vaccination among pregnant women : a systematic review-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5098470-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineMedicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5098470-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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