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Conference Paper: The relationship between hope, rumination response styles, rumination content and psychological adjustment among childhood cancer patients and survivors

TitleThe relationship between hope, rumination response styles, rumination content and psychological adjustment among childhood cancer patients and survivors
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Oncology medical sciences
Pediatrics
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1545-5017/
Citation
The 45th Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP 2013), Hong Kong, China, 25-28 September 2013. In Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 2013, v. 60 S3, p. 180, abstract no. P-0542 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Two types of rumination response styles, brooding and reflective, were widely studied among trauma survivors but had not been investigated among childhood cancer survivors and patients. This study aimed at investigating whether hope, rumination response styles and rumination content were related with childhood cancer patients’ and survivors’ psychological adjustment after treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 89 childhood cancer survivors, aged 17.2 to 31.3, were recruited from Children’s Cancer Foundation Survivors’ Club to complete The Hope Scale, The Chinese Cancer-related Rumination Scale (CCRRS), Chinese Responses Styles Questionnaire-Rumination sub-scale (RSQ-Rum), Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory through mailing survey. 18 childhood cancer patients, aged 8 to 16, who had just completed acute cancer treatment no more than three months and were in remission were recruited from hospital out-patient clinics to complete Children’s Hope Scale, Children’s Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children, CCRRS and RSQ-Rum. RESULTS: Correlational studies on survivors found that brooding but not reflective rumination correlated with depression (r = 0.47, p < 0.01) and anxiety (r = 0.358, p < 0.01). Rumination on negative cancer-related content correlated with depression (r = 0.376, p < 0.01) and anxiety (r = 0.333, p < 0.01). Hope correlated negatively with depression (r = -0.525, p < 0.01) and anxiety (r = -0.347, p < 0.01). Correlational studies among patients suggested brooding (r = 0.585, p < 0.05) and negative content rumination (r = 0.487, p < 0.05) correlated with anxiety but were unrelated to depression. Hope again correlated negatively with depression (r = -0.605, p < 0.01) and anxiety (r = -0.535, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Brooding and negative content rumination were associated with depression and anxiety among survivors and were related to anxiety among patients. Hope served as a protective factor for both survivors and patients. This finding would support fostering of hope and reduction in brooding and negative rumination in psychotherapy.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Supplement: SIOP Abstratcs: 45th Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) ... 2013
Poster Session - Psychosocial: abstract no. P-0542
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193636
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.634
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.505

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYuen, ANYen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, SMYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiang, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, HLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLing, SCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-20T05:12:15Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-20T05:12:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 45th Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP 2013), Hong Kong, China, 25-28 September 2013. In Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 2013, v. 60 S3, p. 180, abstract no. P-0542en_US
dc.identifier.issn1545-5009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193636-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Supplement: SIOP Abstratcs: 45th Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) ... 2013-
dc.descriptionPoster Session - Psychosocial: abstract no. P-0542-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Two types of rumination response styles, brooding and reflective, were widely studied among trauma survivors but had not been investigated among childhood cancer survivors and patients. This study aimed at investigating whether hope, rumination response styles and rumination content were related with childhood cancer patients’ and survivors’ psychological adjustment after treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 89 childhood cancer survivors, aged 17.2 to 31.3, were recruited from Children’s Cancer Foundation Survivors’ Club to complete The Hope Scale, The Chinese Cancer-related Rumination Scale (CCRRS), Chinese Responses Styles Questionnaire-Rumination sub-scale (RSQ-Rum), Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory through mailing survey. 18 childhood cancer patients, aged 8 to 16, who had just completed acute cancer treatment no more than three months and were in remission were recruited from hospital out-patient clinics to complete Children’s Hope Scale, Children’s Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children, CCRRS and RSQ-Rum. RESULTS: Correlational studies on survivors found that brooding but not reflective rumination correlated with depression (r = 0.47, p < 0.01) and anxiety (r = 0.358, p < 0.01). Rumination on negative cancer-related content correlated with depression (r = 0.376, p < 0.01) and anxiety (r = 0.333, p < 0.01). Hope correlated negatively with depression (r = -0.525, p < 0.01) and anxiety (r = -0.347, p < 0.01). Correlational studies among patients suggested brooding (r = 0.585, p < 0.05) and negative content rumination (r = 0.487, p < 0.05) correlated with anxiety but were unrelated to depression. Hope again correlated negatively with depression (r = -0.605, p < 0.01) and anxiety (r = -0.535, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Brooding and negative content rumination were associated with depression and anxiety among survivors and were related to anxiety among patients. Hope served as a protective factor for both survivors and patients. This finding would support fostering of hope and reduction in brooding and negative rumination in psychotherapy.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1545-5017/-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Blood & Canceren_US
dc.rightsPediatric Blood & Cancer. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOncology medical sciences-
dc.subjectPediatrics-
dc.titleThe relationship between hope, rumination response styles, rumination content and psychological adjustment among childhood cancer patients and survivorsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChiang, A: chiangak@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChiang, A=rp00403en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pbc.24719-
dc.identifier.hkuros227214en_US
dc.identifier.volume60-
dc.identifier.issueS3-
dc.identifier.spage180-
dc.identifier.epage180-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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