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Article: Responsiveness was similar between direct and mapped SF-6D in colorectal cancer patients who declined

TitleResponsiveness was similar between direct and mapped SF-6D in colorectal cancer patients who declined
Authors
KeywordsSF-6D
Responsiveness
Preference-based
Mapping
Colorectal cancer
Anchor
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jclinepi
Citation
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 2014, v. 67 n. 2, p. 219-227 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the responsiveness of generic and mapped preference-based measures based on the anchor of global change in health condition of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A baseline sample of 333 Chinese CRC patients was recruited between September 2009 and July 2010 and was surveyed prospectively at 6-month follow-up. Preference-based indices were derived from the generic SF-6D measure (SF-6DDirect), from the Short Form-12 (SF-6DSF-12), and mapped from the condition-specific Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal (SF-6DFACT-C). Responsiveness of three measures was assessed using standardized effect size, standardized response mean, responsiveness statistic, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. RESULTS: The SF-6DSF-12 and SF-6DFACT-C indices were significantly more responsive to detect positive changes than the SF-6DDirect index in improved groups. In worsened group, the SF-6DDirect and SF-6DFACT-C indices showed significant decline from baseline to 6-month follow-up. The areas under the ROC curve for SF-6DDirect and SF-6DFACT-C indices were not statistically different from 0.7. The SF-6DFACT-C index was more responsive to changes in health status compared with other indices. CONCLUSION: Direct SF-6D measure was more responsive than mapped preference-based measures in improved group but the direction was reversed in worsened group. The use of a preference-based index mapped from a condition-specific measure captures both negative and positive important changes among CRC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193596
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.703
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.559
ISI Accession Number ID
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorMulhern, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, YFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-20T05:07:23Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-20T05:07:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Epidemiology, 2014, v. 67 n. 2, p. 219-227en_US
dc.identifier.issn0895-4356-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193596-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the responsiveness of generic and mapped preference-based measures based on the anchor of global change in health condition of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A baseline sample of 333 Chinese CRC patients was recruited between September 2009 and July 2010 and was surveyed prospectively at 6-month follow-up. Preference-based indices were derived from the generic SF-6D measure (SF-6DDirect), from the Short Form-12 (SF-6DSF-12), and mapped from the condition-specific Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colorectal (SF-6DFACT-C). Responsiveness of three measures was assessed using standardized effect size, standardized response mean, responsiveness statistic, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. RESULTS: The SF-6DSF-12 and SF-6DFACT-C indices were significantly more responsive to detect positive changes than the SF-6DDirect index in improved groups. In worsened group, the SF-6DDirect and SF-6DFACT-C indices showed significant decline from baseline to 6-month follow-up. The areas under the ROC curve for SF-6DDirect and SF-6DFACT-C indices were not statistically different from 0.7. The SF-6DFACT-C index was more responsive to changes in health status compared with other indices. CONCLUSION: Direct SF-6D measure was more responsive than mapped preference-based measures in improved group but the direction was reversed in worsened group. The use of a preference-based index mapped from a condition-specific measure captures both negative and positive important changes among CRC.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jclinepien_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Epidemiologyen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 2014, v. 67 n. 2, p. 219-227. DOI: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.08.011en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectSF-6D-
dc.subjectResponsiveness-
dc.subjectPreference-based-
dc.subjectMapping-
dc.subjectColorectal cancer-
dc.subjectAnchor-
dc.titleResponsiveness was similar between direct and mapped SF-6D in colorectal cancer patients who declineden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, CKH: carlosho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWan, YF: yfwan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.08.011en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24189090-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84891626712-
dc.identifier.hkuros227202en_US
dc.identifier.volume67en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage219en_US
dc.identifier.epage227en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000329592200017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.relation.projectA Study on Health-related Quality of Life of patients with Colorectal Neoplasm and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Screening in Hong Kong-

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