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postgraduate thesis: Modeling diabetic cardiomyopathy using embryonic stem cells

TitleModeling diabetic cardiomyopathy using embryonic stem cells
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Mak, S. T. [麥肇鑛]. (2013). Modeling diabetic cardiomyopathy using embryonic stem cells. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5097108
AbstractDiabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), a disorder of the heart muscle, is one of the major and most rampant culprits claiming thousands and thousands of lives around the globe every year by interfering with the blood circulation and causing the development of heart failure eventually. The progression of the disease is asymptomatic and having a long latent period, and it is characterized functionally by ventricular dilation, diastolic dysfunction, interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. It was suggested the pathogenesis of the disease and the related complications are related to the effects of hyperglycemia on cardiomyocytes. So understanding the physiology of both the normal and pathological conditions, and the underlying mechanisms involved are of paramount importance to derive therapies to cope with this disease. However, it is difficult, if not impossible, to study the physiology in vivo using a live sample or to build a cellular model with adult cardiomyocytes due to the insufficient number of the cells harvested. This is not until the emergence of Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) that a cellular model with clinical sufficient number of cardiomyocytes could be built for investigation and drug screening. With a view to mimicking the situation of the Diabetic cardiomyopathy of the Type II Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, mouse ESCs are used to differentiate into cardiomyocytes using the traditional hanging drop method to produce Embryoid body (EB). The cardiomyocytes were then enriched and plated so that different testing conditions could be applied. The effect of high glucose (HG), Insulin and the combination of high glucose and insulin were then analyzed. This was to show the significance of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia due to insulin resistance and the role of insulin in hyperglycemia on cardiomyocytes respectively. The results agreed with previous findings that high glucose and insulin alone do induce cells apoptosis while the combination of insulin and glucose did decrease the number of apoptosis and while the co-culture of insulin with High dosage of glucose has shown to reduce the effect of hypertrophy.
DegreeMaster of Medical Sciences
SubjectCardiovascular system - Diseases
Diabetic angiopathies
embryonic stem cells
Dept/ProgramMedicine
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193562

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMak, Shiu-kwong, Thomas-
dc.contributor.author麥肇鑛-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-13T23:10:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-13T23:10:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationMak, S. T. [麥肇鑛]. (2013). Modeling diabetic cardiomyopathy using embryonic stem cells. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5097108-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193562-
dc.description.abstractDiabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), a disorder of the heart muscle, is one of the major and most rampant culprits claiming thousands and thousands of lives around the globe every year by interfering with the blood circulation and causing the development of heart failure eventually. The progression of the disease is asymptomatic and having a long latent period, and it is characterized functionally by ventricular dilation, diastolic dysfunction, interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. It was suggested the pathogenesis of the disease and the related complications are related to the effects of hyperglycemia on cardiomyocytes. So understanding the physiology of both the normal and pathological conditions, and the underlying mechanisms involved are of paramount importance to derive therapies to cope with this disease. However, it is difficult, if not impossible, to study the physiology in vivo using a live sample or to build a cellular model with adult cardiomyocytes due to the insufficient number of the cells harvested. This is not until the emergence of Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) that a cellular model with clinical sufficient number of cardiomyocytes could be built for investigation and drug screening. With a view to mimicking the situation of the Diabetic cardiomyopathy of the Type II Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, mouse ESCs are used to differentiate into cardiomyocytes using the traditional hanging drop method to produce Embryoid body (EB). The cardiomyocytes were then enriched and plated so that different testing conditions could be applied. The effect of high glucose (HG), Insulin and the combination of high glucose and insulin were then analyzed. This was to show the significance of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia due to insulin resistance and the role of insulin in hyperglycemia on cardiomyocytes respectively. The results agreed with previous findings that high glucose and insulin alone do induce cells apoptosis while the combination of insulin and glucose did decrease the number of apoptosis and while the co-culture of insulin with High dosage of glucose has shown to reduce the effect of hypertrophy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshCardiovascular system - Diseases-
dc.subject.lcshDiabetic angiopathies-
dc.subject.lcshembryonic stem cells-
dc.titleModeling diabetic cardiomyopathy using embryonic stem cells-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5097108-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Medical Sciences-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineMedicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5097108-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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