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postgraduate thesis: Detecting microstructural changes in MRI normal-appearing tissues of the central nervous system by diffusion tensor and kurtosis imaging

TitleDetecting microstructural changes in MRI normal-appearing tissues of the central nervous system by diffusion tensor and kurtosis imaging
Authors
Advisors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Qian, W. [錢文樞]. (2013). Detecting microstructural changes in MRI normal-appearing tissues of the central nervous system by diffusion tensor and kurtosis imaging. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5108680
AbstractThis thesis aimed to investigate the feasibility of two diffusion imaging techniques, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI), on detecting subtle physiological or pathological microstructural changes in normal-appearing neural tissues of human central nervous system.    At first, ten patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and twelve age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were recruited. DTI-derived indices including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial and radial diffusivities were quantified in the lateral and dorsal columns of cervical spinal cord. Based on the regions of interest (ROIs) measurement, NMO patients showed reduced FA, increased MD and radial diffusivity compared to control subjects, while axial diffusivity did not show any significant difference. The three former DTI metrics also showed significant correlations with disability scores, and especially FA was found to be sensitive to mild NMO. Our results show that DTI-derived indices can quantitatively assess the white matter (WM) abnormalities with seemingly normal appearance in conventional MRI, and are associated with the level of clinical disability, suggesting that DTI may have great potential as a useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.    DKI is an extension of conventional DTI to probe the non-Gaussian diffusion property in biological tissues. Besides the four conventional DTI-derived metrics, DKI also provide three additional kurtosis metrics (mean kurtosis (MK), axial and radial kurtosis). In the second study, ROI-based analysis was used to characterize age-related microstructural changes in WM, cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM) of 27 healthy adults (21~59 yrs). Though the volumes of GM and WM were still preserved, DTI-derived metrics can detect the subtle changes in WM and GM. Meanwhile, MK and radial kurtosis significantly increased in both caudate nucleus and putamen while Thalamus showed little aging effect in the diffusivity and kurtosis metrics but significantly decreased only in FA. Our results demonstrated that DKI is sensitive to detect the age-related alterations in neural microstructures at the stage of early aging.    In addition, DKI has been applied to detect the pathological changes in the normal-appearing neural tissues of 18 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), compared to 22 healthy controls. Diffuse WM abnormalities have been observed extensively in the brain, revealed by DKI-derived metrics. Though the volumetric and voxel-wise analysis revealed no significant changes in the volume of cortical GM, decreased FA and kurtoses with increased diffusivities in MS group were sensitive to disclose the subtle alterations in global and regional cortical GM tissues. Significant correlations have been found between FA in the global, frontal and temporal cortical GM in relapsing-remitting MS patients and their disability scores, suggesting FA as an important biomarker to monitor the disease progress in cortical GM. Moreover, elevated kurtosis indices in MS patients did not correlate with diffusivities in caudate nucleus, putamen and thalamus, suggesting these metrics may be vulnerable to different pathologic aspects of the disease.    In conclusion, DKI is sensitive to neural alterations during normal aging and in MS pathologies, and can provide complementary information to conventional MRI and DTI.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectCentral nervous system - Imaging
Diffusion tensor imaging
Dept/ProgramDiagnostic Radiology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193462

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorKhong, PL-
dc.contributor.advisorMak, HKF-
dc.contributor.authorQian, Wenshu-
dc.contributor.author錢文樞-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-10T09:45:52Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-10T09:45:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationQian, W. [錢文樞]. (2013). Detecting microstructural changes in MRI normal-appearing tissues of the central nervous system by diffusion tensor and kurtosis imaging. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5108680-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193462-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis aimed to investigate the feasibility of two diffusion imaging techniques, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI), on detecting subtle physiological or pathological microstructural changes in normal-appearing neural tissues of human central nervous system.    At first, ten patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and twelve age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were recruited. DTI-derived indices including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial and radial diffusivities were quantified in the lateral and dorsal columns of cervical spinal cord. Based on the regions of interest (ROIs) measurement, NMO patients showed reduced FA, increased MD and radial diffusivity compared to control subjects, while axial diffusivity did not show any significant difference. The three former DTI metrics also showed significant correlations with disability scores, and especially FA was found to be sensitive to mild NMO. Our results show that DTI-derived indices can quantitatively assess the white matter (WM) abnormalities with seemingly normal appearance in conventional MRI, and are associated with the level of clinical disability, suggesting that DTI may have great potential as a useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.    DKI is an extension of conventional DTI to probe the non-Gaussian diffusion property in biological tissues. Besides the four conventional DTI-derived metrics, DKI also provide three additional kurtosis metrics (mean kurtosis (MK), axial and radial kurtosis). In the second study, ROI-based analysis was used to characterize age-related microstructural changes in WM, cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM) of 27 healthy adults (21~59 yrs). Though the volumes of GM and WM were still preserved, DTI-derived metrics can detect the subtle changes in WM and GM. Meanwhile, MK and radial kurtosis significantly increased in both caudate nucleus and putamen while Thalamus showed little aging effect in the diffusivity and kurtosis metrics but significantly decreased only in FA. Our results demonstrated that DKI is sensitive to detect the age-related alterations in neural microstructures at the stage of early aging.    In addition, DKI has been applied to detect the pathological changes in the normal-appearing neural tissues of 18 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), compared to 22 healthy controls. Diffuse WM abnormalities have been observed extensively in the brain, revealed by DKI-derived metrics. Though the volumetric and voxel-wise analysis revealed no significant changes in the volume of cortical GM, decreased FA and kurtoses with increased diffusivities in MS group were sensitive to disclose the subtle alterations in global and regional cortical GM tissues. Significant correlations have been found between FA in the global, frontal and temporal cortical GM in relapsing-remitting MS patients and their disability scores, suggesting FA as an important biomarker to monitor the disease progress in cortical GM. Moreover, elevated kurtosis indices in MS patients did not correlate with diffusivities in caudate nucleus, putamen and thalamus, suggesting these metrics may be vulnerable to different pathologic aspects of the disease.    In conclusion, DKI is sensitive to neural alterations during normal aging and in MS pathologies, and can provide complementary information to conventional MRI and DTI.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshCentral nervous system - Imaging-
dc.subject.lcshDiffusion tensor imaging-
dc.titleDetecting microstructural changes in MRI normal-appearing tissues of the central nervous system by diffusion tensor and kurtosis imaging-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5108680-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineDiagnostic Radiology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5108680-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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