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Article: Patient Perception of Physician Attire Before and After Disclosure of the Risks of Microbial Contamination

TitlePatient Perception of Physician Attire Before and After Disclosure of the Risks of Microbial Contamination
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherInternational Journal of Medical Students. The Journal's web site is located at http://ijms.info/journal/
Citation
International Journal of Medical Students , 2013, v. 1 n. 3, p. 109-114 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The white coat is traditionally considered to be the appropriate attire for physicians but it may also be contaminated with microbes and act as a potential source of infection. We aimed to study patients’ acceptance of physicians’ attire, their underlying reasons, and their reactions to an educational intervention with regards to the risks of contamination. Methods: We conducted a voluntary questionnaire survey at a university teaching hospital in Hong Kong from February to July 2012. 262 patient-responses from adult inpatients and outpatients across various specialties were analysed. Results: White coats were highly favoured (90.8%) when compared with scrubs (22.1%), smart casual (7.6%) and formal (7.3%) wears. ’Professional image’ and ‘ease of identification’ were the main attributes of the white coat. Most patients (92.2%) would prefer doctors washing their white coats every few days, whilst 80.9% believed that doctors were actually doing so. After patients were informed of the potential risk of microbial contamination, white coats remained as the most favoured attire (66.4%), but with scrubs doubling in popularity (45.8%). Smart casual (9.2%) and formal attire (4.6%) remain the least accepted. Conclusion: Despite cross-infections being a significant concern within the healthcare environments, patients’ predominant acceptance and perceived attributes towards the white coat were maintained after an educational intervention on the risks of microbial contamination.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193376
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSo, ECTen_US
dc.contributor.authorFung, FHFen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, JKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, LHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, JSHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, RLYen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, TCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, FSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorVackova, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GKKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-20T03:02:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-20T03:02:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Medical Students , 2013, v. 1 n. 3, p. 109-114en_US
dc.identifier.issn2076-6327-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/193376-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The white coat is traditionally considered to be the appropriate attire for physicians but it may also be contaminated with microbes and act as a potential source of infection. We aimed to study patients’ acceptance of physicians’ attire, their underlying reasons, and their reactions to an educational intervention with regards to the risks of contamination. Methods: We conducted a voluntary questionnaire survey at a university teaching hospital in Hong Kong from February to July 2012. 262 patient-responses from adult inpatients and outpatients across various specialties were analysed. Results: White coats were highly favoured (90.8%) when compared with scrubs (22.1%), smart casual (7.6%) and formal (7.3%) wears. ’Professional image’ and ‘ease of identification’ were the main attributes of the white coat. Most patients (92.2%) would prefer doctors washing their white coats every few days, whilst 80.9% believed that doctors were actually doing so. After patients were informed of the potential risk of microbial contamination, white coats remained as the most favoured attire (66.4%), but with scrubs doubling in popularity (45.8%). Smart casual (9.2%) and formal attire (4.6%) remain the least accepted. Conclusion: Despite cross-infections being a significant concern within the healthcare environments, patients’ predominant acceptance and perceived attributes towards the white coat were maintained after an educational intervention on the risks of microbial contamination.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Medical Students. The Journal's web site is located at http://ijms.info/journal/-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Medical Studentsen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePatient Perception of Physician Attire Before and After Disclosure of the Risks of Microbial Contaminationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVackova, D: vackova@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GKK: gilberto@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GKK=rp00522en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros227084en_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage109en_US
dc.identifier.epage114en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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