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postgraduate thesis: Religion and the sacred in the works of Haruki Murakami

TitleReligion and the sacred in the works of Haruki Murakami
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Bates, D. C.. (2013). Religion and the sacred in the works of Haruki Murakami. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5091008
AbstractThis dissertation demonstrates how the Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami infuses religious concepts and sacred motifs into his works, generally through surreal events and otherworldly encounters that defy purely realist interpretations. The literary use of these images and themes encourage the author’s unique stylistic mood as well as subsequent magic realist readings, where everyday occurrences are interjected by providential asides and often overt references to the supernatural. This study of Murakami also helps to demonstrate how his postmodern works might be viewed in light of widely accepted narratives from varying religions. Certain trends are established in Murakami, especially via themes like isolation and loneliness, which help replace the traditional search for God with an internal quest for meaning through investigations of identity. This is especially accomplished using the Japanese I-Novel form. The addition of dreams and alternative realities, another common topic, represent other worlds in his fiction that mask Heaven and Hell. The sacred is also habitually linked with the profane and cultish behaviour, casting traditional religious concepts in a negative light. Throughout his career, Murakami has often incorporated a range of ideas from all manner of religious systems, specifically Buddhism, Christianity, and folk mythology. This dissertation, then, addresses a range of critical views on Murakami's fiction, especially considering thematic shifts in later works like 1Q84, which feature concepts of religion and the sacred in a more blatant way.
DegreeMaster of Arts
SubjectReligion in literature
Dept/ProgramEnglish Studies
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192981

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBates, David Christopher-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-14T06:23:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-14T06:23:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationBates, D. C.. (2013). Religion and the sacred in the works of Haruki Murakami. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5091008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192981-
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation demonstrates how the Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami infuses religious concepts and sacred motifs into his works, generally through surreal events and otherworldly encounters that defy purely realist interpretations. The literary use of these images and themes encourage the author’s unique stylistic mood as well as subsequent magic realist readings, where everyday occurrences are interjected by providential asides and often overt references to the supernatural. This study of Murakami also helps to demonstrate how his postmodern works might be viewed in light of widely accepted narratives from varying religions. Certain trends are established in Murakami, especially via themes like isolation and loneliness, which help replace the traditional search for God with an internal quest for meaning through investigations of identity. This is especially accomplished using the Japanese I-Novel form. The addition of dreams and alternative realities, another common topic, represent other worlds in his fiction that mask Heaven and Hell. The sacred is also habitually linked with the profane and cultish behaviour, casting traditional religious concepts in a negative light. Throughout his career, Murakami has often incorporated a range of ideas from all manner of religious systems, specifically Buddhism, Christianity, and folk mythology. This dissertation, then, addresses a range of critical views on Murakami's fiction, especially considering thematic shifts in later works like 1Q84, which feature concepts of religion and the sacred in a more blatant way.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshReligion in literature-
dc.titleReligion and the sacred in the works of Haruki Murakami-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5091008-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Arts-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEnglish Studies-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5091008-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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