File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A 3-year retrospective cohort study of predictors of relapse in first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong

TitleA 3-year retrospective cohort study of predictors of relapse in first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2013, v. 47 n. 8, p. 746-753 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Relapses in psychosis are costly and may have irreversible consequences. Relapse prevention is thus critical in the treatment of schizophrenia. Apart from medication discontinuation, a consistent relapse predictor has not been identified due to limitations in previous studies. We aim to investigate relapse predictors in a large cohort of patients with first-episode psychosis. Method: This is a retrospective cohort study designed to evaluate relapses in first-episode psychosis patients in 3 years. A total of 1400 patients case records were retrieved from a hospital database. Potential relapse predictors including demographic variables, baseline clinical measures, medication adherence, and residual positive symptoms upon clinical stabilization were collected. Results: The cumulative relapse rates were 19.3% by year 1, 38.4% by year 2, and 48.1% by year 3. Multivariate Cox-proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that medication non-adherence, smoking, schizophrenia diagnosis, younger age, and shorter baseline hospitalization were associated with an increased risk of relapse in 3 years. Conclusions: Nearly half of patients relapsed after 3 years following their first-episode psychosis. Smoking as a predictor of relapse is an intriguing new finding supportive of a link between nicotinic receptors and the dopamine system. Their relationship deserves further investigations with potential clinical implications for relapse prevention. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192735
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.536
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.269
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, CL-Men_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, JY-Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, C-Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, GH-Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, W-Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, SK-Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, EH-Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, EY-Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T05:00:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T05:00:05Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2013, v. 47 n. 8, p. 746-753en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192735-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Relapses in psychosis are costly and may have irreversible consequences. Relapse prevention is thus critical in the treatment of schizophrenia. Apart from medication discontinuation, a consistent relapse predictor has not been identified due to limitations in previous studies. We aim to investigate relapse predictors in a large cohort of patients with first-episode psychosis. Method: This is a retrospective cohort study designed to evaluate relapses in first-episode psychosis patients in 3 years. A total of 1400 patients case records were retrieved from a hospital database. Potential relapse predictors including demographic variables, baseline clinical measures, medication adherence, and residual positive symptoms upon clinical stabilization were collected. Results: The cumulative relapse rates were 19.3% by year 1, 38.4% by year 2, and 48.1% by year 3. Multivariate Cox-proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that medication non-adherence, smoking, schizophrenia diagnosis, younger age, and shorter baseline hospitalization were associated with an increased risk of relapse in 3 years. Conclusions: Nearly half of patients relapsed after 3 years following their first-episode psychosis. Smoking as a predictor of relapse is an intriguing new finding supportive of a link between nicotinic receptors and the dopamine system. Their relationship deserves further investigations with potential clinical implications for relapse prevention. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.titleA 3-year retrospective cohort study of predictors of relapse in first-episode psychosis in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0004867413487229en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23612934-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84884264576en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214632-
dc.identifier.volume47en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage746en_US
dc.identifier.epage753en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000329558100010-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats