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Article: Dietary nitrate in Japanese traditional foods lowers diastolic blood pressure in healthy volunteers

TitleDietary nitrate in Japanese traditional foods lowers diastolic blood pressure in healthy volunteers
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Nitric Oxide - Biology and Chemistry, 2010, v. 22 n. 2, p. 136-140 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Japanese longevity is the highest in the world. This is partly explained by low occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, which in turn is attributed to the Japanese traditional diet (JTD). Recent research demonstrates that nitric oxide (NO), a key regulator of vascular integrity, can be generated from nitrate (NO3 -), abundantly found in vegetables. It can reduce blood pressure (BP) via its serial reduction to nitrite (NO2 -) and to bioactive NO. Interestingly, JTD is extremely rich in nitrate and the daily consumption is higher than in any other known diet. Objective and design: In a randomized, cross-over trial we examined the effect of a 10-day period of JTD on blood pressure in 25 healthy volunteers. Traditional Japanese vegetables were encouraged to be consumed and avoided during the control period. Daily nitrate intake was calculated. Results: Nitrate naturally provided by the JTD was 18.8 mg/kg/bw/day, exceeding the Acceptable Daily Intake by five times (ADI, 3.7 mg/kg/bw). Plasma and salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite were higher at the end of the JTD period. Diastolic BP decreased on average 4.5 mm Hg during JTD compared to the control diet (P = 0.0066) while systolic BP was not affected. This effect was evident in normotensive subjects and similar to that seen in the recent studies. Conclusions: An ordinary nitrate rich diet may positively affect blood pressure. Our findings further support the importance of the role of dietary nitrate on BP regulation suggesting one possible explanation of healthy aspects of traditional Japanese food. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192701
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.76
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.292
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSobko, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorMarcus, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorGovoni, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorKamiya, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T04:56:09Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T04:56:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationNitric Oxide - Biology and Chemistry, 2010, v. 22 n. 2, p. 136-140en_US
dc.identifier.issn1089-8603en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192701-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Japanese longevity is the highest in the world. This is partly explained by low occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, which in turn is attributed to the Japanese traditional diet (JTD). Recent research demonstrates that nitric oxide (NO), a key regulator of vascular integrity, can be generated from nitrate (NO3 -), abundantly found in vegetables. It can reduce blood pressure (BP) via its serial reduction to nitrite (NO2 -) and to bioactive NO. Interestingly, JTD is extremely rich in nitrate and the daily consumption is higher than in any other known diet. Objective and design: In a randomized, cross-over trial we examined the effect of a 10-day period of JTD on blood pressure in 25 healthy volunteers. Traditional Japanese vegetables were encouraged to be consumed and avoided during the control period. Daily nitrate intake was calculated. Results: Nitrate naturally provided by the JTD was 18.8 mg/kg/bw/day, exceeding the Acceptable Daily Intake by five times (ADI, 3.7 mg/kg/bw). Plasma and salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite were higher at the end of the JTD period. Diastolic BP decreased on average 4.5 mm Hg during JTD compared to the control diet (P = 0.0066) while systolic BP was not affected. This effect was evident in normotensive subjects and similar to that seen in the recent studies. Conclusions: An ordinary nitrate rich diet may positively affect blood pressure. Our findings further support the importance of the role of dietary nitrate on BP regulation suggesting one possible explanation of healthy aspects of traditional Japanese food. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNitric Oxide - Biology and Chemistryen_US
dc.titleDietary nitrate in Japanese traditional foods lowers diastolic blood pressure in healthy volunteersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.niox.2009.10.007en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19887114-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75149158338en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage136en_US
dc.identifier.epage140en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274721900010-

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